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Insects 2017, 8(3), 68; doi:10.3390/insects8030068

Jamaica’s Critically Endangered Butterfly: A Review of the Biology and Conservation Status of the Homerus Swallowtail (Papilio (Pterourus) homerus Fabricius)

1
Department of Biological Sciences, Kent State University at Stark, North Canton, OH 44720, USA
2
Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
3
McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity, Florida Museum of Natural History, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
4
Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Brian T. Forschler
Received: 21 June 2017 / Revised: 5 July 2017 / Accepted: 7 July 2017 / Published: 10 July 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Butterfly Conservation)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [8383 KB, uploaded 11 July 2017]   |  

Abstract

The Homerus swallowtail, Papilio (Pterourus) homerus Fabricius, is listed as an endangered species and is endemic to the Caribbean island of Jamaica. The largest butterfly in the Western Hemisphere, P. homerus once inhabited seven of Jamaica’s 14 parishes and consisted of at least three populations; however, now only two stronghold populations remain, a western population in the rugged Cockpit Country and an eastern population in the Blue and John Crow Mountains. Despite numerous studies of its life history, much about the population biology, including estimates of total numbers of individuals in each population, remains unknown. In addition, a breeding program is needed to establish an experimental population, which could be used to augment wild populations and ensure the continued survival of the species. Here, we present a review of the biology of P. homerus and recommendations for a conservation plan. View Full-Text
Keywords: Homerus swallowtail; Jamaica; Papilio homerus; conservation; endangered species; flagship species Homerus swallowtail; Jamaica; Papilio homerus; conservation; endangered species; flagship species
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Lehnert, M.S.; Kramer, V.R.; Rawlins, J.E.; Verdecia, V.; Daniels, J.C. Jamaica’s Critically Endangered Butterfly: A Review of the Biology and Conservation Status of the Homerus Swallowtail (Papilio (Pterourus) homerus Fabricius). Insects 2017, 8, 68.

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