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Insects 2017, 8(2), 57; doi:10.3390/insects8020057

Density and Habitat Relationships of the Endemic White Mountain Fritillary (Boloria chariclea montinus) (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae)

1
Vermont Center for Ecostudies, Norwich, VT 05055, USA
1
*Correspondence: kmcfarland@vtecostudies.org
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jaret C. Daniels
Received: 29 March 2017 / Revised: 27 May 2017 / Accepted: 29 May 2017 / Published: 4 June 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Butterfly Conservation)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1403 KB, uploaded 13 June 2017]   |  

Abstract

We conducted point counts in the alpine zone of the Presidential Range of the White Mountains, New Hampshire, USA, to estimate the distribution and density of the rare endemic White Mountain Fritillary (Boloria chariclea montinus). Incidence of occurrence and density of the endemic White Mountain Fritillary during surveys in 2012 and 2013 were greatest in the herbaceous-snowbank plant community. Densities at points in the heath-shrub-rush plant community were lower, but because this plant community is more widespread in the alpine zone, it likely supports the bulk of adult fritillaries. White Mountain Fritillary used cushion-tussock, the other alpine plant community suspected of providing habitat, only sparingly. Detectability of White Mountain Fritillaries varied as a consequence of weather conditions during the survey and among observers, suggesting that raw counts yield biased estimates of density and abundance. Point counts, commonly used to study and monitor populations of birds, were an effective means of sampling White Mountain Fritillary in the alpine environment where patches of habitat are small, irregularly shaped, and widely spaced, rendering line-transect methods inefficient and difficult to implement. View Full-Text
Keywords: Boloria chariclea montinus; White Mountain Fritillary; point count; distance sampling; butterfly survey methods; population monitoring; conservation; butterfly; Lepidoptera Boloria chariclea montinus; White Mountain Fritillary; point count; distance sampling; butterfly survey methods; population monitoring; conservation; butterfly; Lepidoptera
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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McFarland, K.P.; Lloyd, J.D.; Hardy, S.P. Density and Habitat Relationships of the Endemic White Mountain Fritillary (Boloria chariclea montinus) (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae). Insects 2017, 8, 57.

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