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Insects 2017, 8(2), 61; doi:10.3390/insects8020061

The Biology and Control of the Greater Wax Moth, Galleria mellonella

1
International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (icipe), P.O. Box 30772-00100, Nairobi, Kenya
2
School of Biological Sciences, University of Nairobi, P.O. Box 30197-00100, Nairobi, Kenya
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Michael J. Stout, Jeff Davis, Rodrigo Diaz and Julien M. Beuzelin
Received: 5 April 2017 / Revised: 15 May 2017 / Accepted: 24 May 2017 / Published: 9 June 2017
(This article belongs to the Collection Integrated Pest Management)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [890 KB, uploaded 13 June 2017]   |  

Abstract

The greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella Linnaeus, is a ubiquitous pest of the honeybee, Apis mellifera Linnaeus, and Apis cerana Fabricius. The greater wax moth larvae burrow into the edge of unsealed cells with pollen, bee brood, and honey through to the midrib of honeybee comb. Burrowing larvae leave behind masses of webs which causes galleriasis and later absconding of colonies. The damage caused by G. mellonella larvae is severe in tropical and sub-tropical regions, and is believed to be one of the contributing factors to the decline in both feral and wild honeybee populations. Previously, the pest was considered a nuisance in honeybee colonies, therefore, most studies have focused on the pest as a model for in vivo studies of toxicology and pathogenicity. It is currently widespread, especially in Africa, and the potential of transmitting honeybee viruses has raised legitimate concern, thus, there is need for more studies to find sustainable integrated management strategies. However, our knowledge of this pest is limited. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge on the biology, distribution, economic damage, and management options. In addition, we provide prospects that need consideration for better understanding and management of the pest. View Full-Text
Keywords: honeybees; pests; Galleria mellonella; management; semiochemicals honeybees; pests; Galleria mellonella; management; semiochemicals
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Kwadha, C.A.; Ong’amo, G.O.; Ndegwa, P.N.; Raina, S.K.; Fombong, A.T. The Biology and Control of the Greater Wax Moth, Galleria mellonella. Insects 2017, 8, 61.

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