Next Article in Journal
The Differential Effect of Low-Dose Mixtures of Four Pesticides on the Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum
Next Article in Special Issue
Efficacy of Topical Application, Leaf Residue or Soil Drench of Blastospores of Isaria fumosorosea for Citrus Root Weevil Management: Laboratory and Greenhouse Investigations
Previous Article in Journal
Periodic Physical Disturbance: An Alternative Method for Controlling Sitophilus zeamais (Maize Weevil) Infestation
Previous Article in Special Issue
Prey-Mediated Effects of Drought on the Consumption Rates of Coccinellid Predators of Elatobium abietinum
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Insects 2016, 7(4), 52; doi:10.3390/insects7040052

Biological Control of Mosquito Vectors: Past, Present, and Future

1
Insect Behaviour Group, Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Pisa, Pisa 56124, Italy
2
Department of Disease Control, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 3 August 2016 / Accepted: 28 September 2016 / Published: 3 October 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Control of Invertebrate Pests)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [4631 KB, uploaded 3 October 2016]   |  

Abstract

Mosquitoes represent the major arthropod vectors of human disease worldwide transmitting malaria, lymphatic filariasis, and arboviruses such as dengue virus and Zika virus. Unfortunately, no treatment (in the form of vaccines or drugs) is available for most of these diseases and vector control is still the main form of prevention. The limitations of traditional insecticide-based strategies, particularly the development of insecticide resistance, have resulted in significant efforts to develop alternative eco-friendly methods. Biocontrol strategies aim to be sustainable and target a range of different mosquito species to reduce the current reliance on insecticide-based mosquito control. In this review, we outline non-insecticide based strategies that have been implemented or are currently being tested. We also highlight the use of mosquito behavioural knowledge that can be exploited for control strategies. View Full-Text
Keywords: mosquito-borne diseases; arboviruses; boosted SIT (Sterile Insect Technique); copepods; larvivorous fishes; sex pheromones; sterile insect technique; sound traps; swarm manipulation; Wolbachia bacteria mosquito-borne diseases; arboviruses; boosted SIT (Sterile Insect Technique); copepods; larvivorous fishes; sex pheromones; sterile insect technique; sound traps; swarm manipulation; Wolbachia bacteria
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Benelli, G.; Jeffries, C.L.; Walker, T. Biological Control of Mosquito Vectors: Past, Present, and Future. Insects 2016, 7, 52.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Insects EISSN 2075-4450 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top