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Water 2016, 8(5), 181; doi:10.3390/w8050181

Response of Hydrological Processes to Input Data in High Alpine Catchment: An Assessment of the Yarkant River basin in China

1
State Key Laboratory of Desert and Oasis Ecology, Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011, China
2
University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
3
Department of Geography, Ghent University, Gent 9000, Belgium
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Athanasios Loukas
Received: 22 February 2016 / Revised: 16 April 2016 / Accepted: 25 April 2016 / Published: 5 May 2016
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [3639 KB, uploaded 5 May 2016]   |  

Abstract

Most studies of input data used in hydrological models have focused on flow; however, point discharge data negligibly reflect deviations in spatial input data. To study the effects of different input data sources on hydrological processes at the catchment scale, eight MIKE SHE models driven by station-based data (SBD) and remote sensing data (RSD) were implemented. The significant influences of input variables on water components were examined using an analysis of the variance model (ANOVA) with the hydrologic catchment response quantified based on different water components. The results suggest that compared with SBD, RSD precipitation resulted in greater differences in snow storage in the different elevation bands and RSD temperatures led to more snowpack areas with thinner depths. These changes in snowpack provided an appropriate interpretation of precipitation and temperature distinctions between RSD and SBD. For potential evapotranspiration (PET), the larger RSD value caused less plant transpiration because parameters were adjusted to satisfy the outflow. At the catchment scale, the spatiotemporal distributions of sensitive water components, which can be defined by the ANOVA model, indicate that this approach is rational for assessing the impacts of input data on hydrological processes. View Full-Text
Keywords: input data; hydrological processes; statistic hypothesis test; spatiotemporal distribution; Yarkant River; MIKE SHE input data; hydrological processes; statistic hypothesis test; spatiotemporal distribution; Yarkant River; MIKE SHE
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Liu, J.; Liu, T.; Bao, A.; De Maeyer, P.; Kurban, A.; Chen, X. Response of Hydrological Processes to Input Data in High Alpine Catchment: An Assessment of the Yarkant River basin in China. Water 2016, 8, 181.

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