Next Article in Journal
Desalination of Water Using ZVI (Fe0)
Previous Article in Journal
Evaluation of a Modified Monod Model for Predicting Algal Dynamics in Lake Tai
Previous Article in Special Issue
Estimating the Determinants of Residential Water Demand in Italy
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Water 2015, 7(7), 3643-3670; doi:10.3390/w7073643

Modeling Residential Water Consumption in Amman: The Role of Intermittency, Storage, and Pricing for Piped and Tanker Water

1
Department of Economics, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, Leipzig 04318, Germany
2
Faculty of Economics and Business Management, Institute of Infrastructure and Resources Management, Leipzig University, Grimmaische Str. 12, Leipzig 04109, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Enedir Ghisi
Received: 2 March 2015 / Revised: 18 June 2015 / Accepted: 19 June 2015 / Published: 10 July 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Consumption and Water End-uses in Buildings)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2600 KB, uploaded 15 July 2015]   |  

Abstract

Jordan faces an archetypal combination of high water scarcity, with a per capita water availability of around 150 m3 per year significantly below the absolute scarcity threshold of 500 m3, and strong population growth, especially due to the Syrian refugee crisis. A transition to more sustainable water consumption patterns will likely require Jordan’s water authorities to rely more strongly on water demand management in the future. We conduct a case study of the effects of pricing policies, using an agent-based model of household water consumption in Jordan’s capital Amman, in order to analyze the distribution of burdens imposed by demand-side policies across society. Amman’s households face highly intermittent piped water supply, leading them to supplement it with water from storage tanks and informal private tanker operators. Using a detailed data set of the distribution of supply durations across Amman, our model can derive the demand for additional tanker water. We find that integrating these different supply sources into our model causes demand-side policies to have strongly heterogeneous effects across districts and income groups. This highlights the importance of a disaggregated perspective on water policy impacts in order to identify and potentially mitigate excessive burdens. View Full-Text
Keywords: household water consumption; intermittent supply; water tankers; socio-hydrology; hydro-economics; agent-based model; water scarcity; demand-side policies; consumer surplus; long-term sustainability; Jordan household water consumption; intermittent supply; water tankers; socio-hydrology; hydro-economics; agent-based model; water scarcity; demand-side policies; consumer surplus; long-term sustainability; Jordan
Figures

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Klassert, C.; Sigel, K.; Gawel, E.; Klauer, B. Modeling Residential Water Consumption in Amman: The Role of Intermittency, Storage, and Pricing for Piped and Tanker Water. Water 2015, 7, 3643-3670.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Water EISSN 2073-4441 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top