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Micromachines 2016, 7(5), 84; doi:10.3390/mi7050084

High Throughput Studies of Cell Migration in 3D Microtissues Fabricated by a Droplet Microfluidic Chip

1,†
,
2,†
,
2,3,* and 1,*
1
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University; Ames, IA 50011, USA
2
Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Iowa State University; Ames, IA 50011, USA
3
Department of Genetics, Development and Cell Biology, Iowa State University; Ames, IA 50011, USA
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Manabu Tokeshi and Kiichi Sato
Received: 20 March 2016 / Revised: 25 April 2016 / Accepted: 26 April 2016 / Published: 5 May 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Micro/Nano Devices for Chemical Analysis)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2322 KB, uploaded 5 May 2016]   |  

Abstract

Arrayed three-dimensional (3D) micro-sized tissues with encapsulated cells (microtissues) have been fabricated by a droplet microfluidic chip. The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a polymerized collagen network. One or multiple breast cancer cells were embedded within the microtissues, which were stored in arrayed microchambers on the same chip without ECM droplet shrinkage over 48 h. The migration trajectory of the cells was recorded by optical microscopy. The migration speed was calculated in the range of 3–6 µm/h. Interestingly, cells in devices filled with a continuous collagen network migrated faster than those where only droplets were arrayed in the chambers. This is likely due to differences in the length scales of the ECM network, as cells embedded in thin collagen slabs also migrate slower than those in thick collagen slabs. In addition to migration, this technical platform can be potentially used to study cancer cell-stromal cell interactions and ECM remodeling in 3D tumor-mimicking environments. View Full-Text
Keywords: cell motility; autocrine; paracrine; 3D micro-sized tissue; microfluidic droplet device cell motility; autocrine; paracrine; 3D micro-sized tissue; microfluidic droplet device
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Che, X.; Nuhn, J.; Schneider, I.; Que, L. High Throughput Studies of Cell Migration in 3D Microtissues Fabricated by a Droplet Microfluidic Chip. Micromachines 2016, 7, 84.

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