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Toxins 2014, 6(3), 830-849; doi:10.3390/toxins6030830
Article

Fusarium Head Blight Control and Prevention of Mycotoxin Contamination in Wheat with Botanicals and Tannic Acid

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Received: 24 December 2013; in revised form: 5 February 2014 / Accepted: 13 February 2014 / Published: 26 February 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances and Perspectives in Deoxynivalenol Research)
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Abstract: Suspensions or solutions with 1% of Chinese galls (Galla chinensis, GC) or 1% of tannic acid (TA), inhibited germination of conidia or mycelium growth of Fusarium graminearum (FG) by 98%–100% or by 75%–80%, respectively, whereas dried bark from buckthorn (Frangula alnus, FA) showed no effect at this concentration. In climate chamber experiments where the wheat variety “Apogee” was artificially inoculated with FG and F. crookwellense (FCr) and treated with 5% suspensions of TA, GC and FA, the deoxynivalenol (DON) content in grains was reduced by 81%, 67% and 33%, respectively. In field experiments with two commercial wheat varieties and artificial or semi-natural inoculations, mean DON reductions of 66% (TA) and 58% (FA), respectively, were obtained. Antifungal toxicity can explain the high efficacies of TA and GC but not those of FA. The Fusarium head blight (FHB) and mycotoxin reducing effect of FA is probably due to elicitation of resistance in wheat plants. With semi-natural inoculation, a single FA application in the first half of the flowering period performed best. However, we assume that applications of FA at the end of ear emergence and a treatment, triggered by an infection period, with TA or GC during flowering, might perform better than synthetic fungicides.
Keywords: Fusarium graminearum (FG); antifungal; natural compound; phenolic; phytoalexin; elicitor; deoxynivalenol (DON); forecasting; organic Fusarium graminearum (FG); antifungal; natural compound; phenolic; phytoalexin; elicitor; deoxynivalenol (DON); forecasting; organic
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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MDPI and ACS Style

Forrer, H.-R.; Musa, T.; Schwab, F.; Jenny, E.; Bucheli, T.D.; Wettstein, F.E.; Vogelgsang, S. Fusarium Head Blight Control and Prevention of Mycotoxin Contamination in Wheat with Botanicals and Tannic Acid. Toxins 2014, 6, 830-849.

AMA Style

Forrer H-R, Musa T, Schwab F, Jenny E, Bucheli TD, Wettstein FE, Vogelgsang S. Fusarium Head Blight Control and Prevention of Mycotoxin Contamination in Wheat with Botanicals and Tannic Acid. Toxins. 2014; 6(3):830-849.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Forrer, Hans-Rudolf; Musa, Tomke; Schwab, Fabienne; Jenny, Eveline; Bucheli, Thomas D.; Wettstein, Felix E.; Vogelgsang, Susanne. 2014. "Fusarium Head Blight Control and Prevention of Mycotoxin Contamination in Wheat with Botanicals and Tannic Acid." Toxins 6, no. 3: 830-849.


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