Next Article in Journal
Brain Functional Connectivity Is Modified by a Hypocaloric Mediterranean Diet and Physical Activity in Obese Women
Previous Article in Journal
A Validation Study of an Interviewer-Administered Short Food Frequency Questionnaire in Assessing Dietary Vitamin D and Calcium Intake in Swedish Children
Article Menu
Issue 7 (July) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Nutrients 2017, 9(7), 683; doi:10.3390/nu9070683

Meat and Seafood Consumption in Relation to Plasma Metabolic Profiles in a Chinese Population: A Combined Untargeted and Targeted Metabolomics Study

1
Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117549, Singapore
2
Institute of Nutrition and Health, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266021, Shandong, China
3
Division of Endocrinology, National University Hospital, Singapore 119074, Singapore
4
Department of Medicine, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Health System, Singapore 119228, Singapore
5
NUS Environmental Research Institute, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117411, Singapore
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 7 June 2017 / Revised: 21 June 2017 / Accepted: 27 June 2017 / Published: 30 June 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [745 KB, uploaded 30 June 2017]   |  

Abstract

We examined the relationship between different patterns of meat and seafood consumption and plasma metabolic profiles in an Asian population. We selected 270 ethnic Chinese men and women from the Singapore Prospective Study Program based on their dietary habits assessed with a validated food frequency questionnaire. Participants were divided into four subgroups: high meat and high seafood (n = 60), high meat and low seafood (n = 64), low meat and high seafood (n = 60), and low meat and low seafood (n = 86) consumers. Plasma metabolites were measured using both targeted and untargeted mass spectroscopy-based analyses. A total of 42 metabolites differed significantly by dietary group. Higher concentrations of essential amino acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and d-glucose were found in high meat and/or seafood consumers as compared with the group with a low consumption of these animal foods. Red meat, poultry, fish, shellfish, soy products, and dairy were each correlated with at least one differential metabolite (r = −0.308 to 0.448). Some observations, such as the correlation between fish and 3-carboxy-4-methyl-5-propyl-2-furanpropanoic acid (CMPF), confirmed previous studies. Other observations, such as the correlation between shellfish and phosphatidylethanolamine (p36:4), were novel. We also observed significant correlations between plasma metabolites and clinical characteristics, such as CMPF with fasting blood glucose (r = 0.401). These findings demonstrate a significant influence of meat and seafood consumption on metabolic profiles in the Asian population. View Full-Text
Keywords: metabolomics; amino acids; fatty acids; CMPF; glucose metabolism; dietary pattern; red meat; poultry; fish; shellfish metabolomics; amino acids; fatty acids; CMPF; glucose metabolism; dietary pattern; red meat; poultry; fish; shellfish
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Lu, Y.; Zou, L.; Su, J.; Tai, E.S.; Whitton, C.; van Dam, R.M.; Ong, C.N. Meat and Seafood Consumption in Relation to Plasma Metabolic Profiles in a Chinese Population: A Combined Untargeted and Targeted Metabolomics Study. Nutrients 2017, 9, 683.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Nutrients EISSN 2072-6643 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top