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Nutrients 2016, 8(3), 111; doi:10.3390/nu8030111

Australians are not Meeting the Recommended Intakes for Omega-3 Long Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Results of an Analysis from the 2011–2012 National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey

School of Medicine, University of Wollongong, Northfields Ave, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
Received: 18 December 2015 / Revised: 3 February 2016 / Accepted: 14 February 2016 / Published: 24 February 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue DHA for Optimal Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1490 KB, uploaded 26 February 2016]   |  

Abstract

Health benefits have been attributed to omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LCPUFA). Therefore it is important to know if Australians are currently meeting the recommended intake for n-3 LCPUFA and if they have increased since the last National Nutrition Survey in 1995 (NNS 1995). Dietary intake data was obtained from the recent 2011–2012 National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey (2011–2012 NNPAS). Linoleic acid (LA) intakes have decreased whilst alpha-linolenic acid (LNA) and n-3 LCPUFA intakes have increased primarily due to n-3 LCPUFA supplements. The median n-3 LCPUFA intakes are less than 50% of the mean n-3 LCPUFA intakes which highlights the highly-skewed n-3 LCPUFA intakes, which shows that there are some people consuming high amounts of n-3 LCPUFA, but the vast majority of the population are consuming much lower amounts. Only 20% of the population meets the recommended n-3 LCPUFA intakes and only 10% of women of childbearing age meet the recommended docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) intake. Fish and seafood is by far the richest source of n-3 LCPUFA including DHA. View Full-Text
Keywords: n-3 LCPUFA; dietary intakes; Australian 2011–2012 national nutrition and physical activity survey; recommended n-3 LCPUFA intakes n-3 LCPUFA; dietary intakes; Australian 2011–2012 national nutrition and physical activity survey; recommended n-3 LCPUFA intakes
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Meyer, B.J. Australians are not Meeting the Recommended Intakes for Omega-3 Long Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Results of an Analysis from the 2011–2012 National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey. Nutrients 2016, 8, 111.

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