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Nutrients 2016, 8(3), 95; doi:10.3390/nu8030095

Nigerian Honey Ameliorates Hyperglycemia and Dyslipidemia in Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Rats

1
Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Faculty of Medicine, Ebonyi State University, Abakaliki 480214, Ebonyi State, Nigeria
2
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ebonyi State University, Abakaliki 480214, Ebonyi State, Nigeria
3
Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ebonyi State University, Abakaliki 480214, Ebonyi State, Nigeria
4
Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu 400211, Enugu State, Nigeria
5
Department of Physiology, College of Health Sciences, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto 840212, Sokoto State, Nigeria
6
Department of Pharmacology, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kubang Kerian 16150, Kelantan, Malaysia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 20 November 2015 / Revised: 14 December 2015 / Accepted: 31 December 2015 / Published: 24 February 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet and Metabolic Dysfunction)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1174 KB, uploaded 24 February 2016]   |  

Abstract

Diabetic dyslipidemia contributes to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Hence, its treatment is necessary to reduce cardiovascular events. Honey reduces hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia. The reproducibility of these beneficial effects and their generalization to honey samples of other geographical parts of the world remain controversial. Currently, data are limited and findings are inconclusive especially with evidence showing honey increased glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetic patients. It was hypothesized that this deteriorating effect might be due to administered high doses. This study investigated if Nigerian honey could ameliorate hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia. It also evaluated if high doses of honey could worsen glucose and lipid abnormalities. Honey (1.0, 2.0 or 3.0 g/kg) was administered to diabetic rats for three weeks. Honey (1.0 or 2.0 g/kg) significantly (p < 0.05) increased high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol while it significantly (p < 0.05) reduced hyperglycemia, triglycerides (TGs), very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, coronary risk index (CRI) and cardiovascular risk index (CVRI). In contrast, honey (3.0 g/kg) significantly (p < 0.05) reduced TGs and VLDL cholesterol. This study confirms the reproducibility of glucose lowering and hypolipidemic effects of honey using Nigerian honey. However, none of the doses deteriorated hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia. View Full-Text
Keywords: honey; diabetes mellitus; hyperglycemia; hyperlipidemia; dyslipidemia; lipid profile; alloxan; rats honey; diabetes mellitus; hyperglycemia; hyperlipidemia; dyslipidemia; lipid profile; alloxan; rats
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Erejuwa, O.O.; Nwobodo, N.N.; Akpan, J.L.; Okorie, U.A.; Ezeonu, C.T.; Ezeokpo, B.C.; Nwadike, K.I.; Erhiano, E.; Abdul Wahab, M.S.; Sulaiman, S.A. Nigerian Honey Ameliorates Hyperglycemia and Dyslipidemia in Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Rats. Nutrients 2016, 8, 95.

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