Nutrients 2013, 5(6), 2093-2113; doi:10.3390/nu5062093
Article

The Role of Viscosity and Fermentability of Dietary Fibers on Satiety- and Adiposity-Related Hormones in Rats

Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108, USA
* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 2 April 2013; in revised form: 28 May 2013 / Accepted: 29 May 2013 / Published: 7 June 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Fiber and Nutrition)
PDF Full-text Download PDF Full-Text [268 KB, uploaded 7 June 2013 12:28 CEST]
Abstract: Dietary fiber may contribute to satiety. This study examined the effect of two dietary fiber characteristics, small intestinal contents viscosity and large intestinal fermentability, on satiety-and adiposity-related hormones in rats. Diets contained fiber sources that were non-viscous, somewhat viscous, or highly viscous, and either highly fermentable or non-fermentable, in a 2 × 3 factorial design. In the fed state (2 h postprandial), rats fed non-fermentable fibers had significantly greater plasma GLP-1 concentration than fermentable fibers. In the fasted state, among non-fermentable fibers, viscosity had no effect on GLP-1 concentration. However, among fermentable fibers, greater viscosity reduced GLP-1 concentration. Plasma peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY) concentrations in the fasted state were not influenced by the fermentability of the fiber overall, however animals consuming a fructooligosaccharide greater PYY concentration. In both the fed and fasted states, rats fed non-fermentable fibers had a significantly lower plasma ghrelin concentration than rats fed fermentable fibers. In the fasted state, rats fed non-fermentable fibers had a significantly lower plasma leptin concentration than rats fed fermentable fibers. Thus, fermentability and viscosity of dietary fiber interacted in complex ways to influence satiety- and adiposity-related plasma hormone concentrations. However, the results suggest that highly viscous, non-fermentable fibers may limit weight gain and reduce adiposity and non-fermentable fibers, regardless of viscosity, may promote meal termination.
Keywords: dietary fiber; viscosity; fermentation; GLP-1; ghrelin; PYY; leptin; insulin; satiety

Article Statistics

Load and display the download statistics.

Citations to this Article

Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Schroeder, N.; Marquart, L.F.; Gallaher, D.D. The Role of Viscosity and Fermentability of Dietary Fibers on Satiety- and Adiposity-Related Hormones in Rats. Nutrients 2013, 5, 2093-2113.

AMA Style

Schroeder N, Marquart LF, Gallaher DD. The Role of Viscosity and Fermentability of Dietary Fibers on Satiety- and Adiposity-Related Hormones in Rats. Nutrients. 2013; 5(6):2093-2113.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Schroeder, Natalia; Marquart, Len F.; Gallaher, Daniel D. 2013. "The Role of Viscosity and Fermentability of Dietary Fibers on Satiety- and Adiposity-Related Hormones in Rats." Nutrients 5, no. 6: 2093-2113.

Nutrients EISSN 2072-6643 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert