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Nutrients 2013, 5(6), 2093-2113; doi:10.3390/nu5062093
Article

The Role of Viscosity and Fermentability of Dietary Fibers on Satiety- and Adiposity-Related Hormones in Rats

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Received: 2 April 2013; in revised form: 28 May 2013 / Accepted: 29 May 2013 / Published: 7 June 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Fiber and Nutrition)
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Abstract: Dietary fiber may contribute to satiety. This study examined the effect of two dietary fiber characteristics, small intestinal contents viscosity and large intestinal fermentability, on satiety-and adiposity-related hormones in rats. Diets contained fiber sources that were non-viscous, somewhat viscous, or highly viscous, and either highly fermentable or non-fermentable, in a 2 × 3 factorial design. In the fed state (2 h postprandial), rats fed non-fermentable fibers had significantly greater plasma GLP-1 concentration than fermentable fibers. In the fasted state, among non-fermentable fibers, viscosity had no effect on GLP-1 concentration. However, among fermentable fibers, greater viscosity reduced GLP-1 concentration. Plasma peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY) concentrations in the fasted state were not influenced by the fermentability of the fiber overall, however animals consuming a fructooligosaccharide greater PYY concentration. In both the fed and fasted states, rats fed non-fermentable fibers had a significantly lower plasma ghrelin concentration than rats fed fermentable fibers. In the fasted state, rats fed non-fermentable fibers had a significantly lower plasma leptin concentration than rats fed fermentable fibers. Thus, fermentability and viscosity of dietary fiber interacted in complex ways to influence satiety- and adiposity-related plasma hormone concentrations. However, the results suggest that highly viscous, non-fermentable fibers may limit weight gain and reduce adiposity and non-fermentable fibers, regardless of viscosity, may promote meal termination.
Keywords: dietary fiber; viscosity; fermentation; GLP-1; ghrelin; PYY; leptin; insulin; satiety dietary fiber; viscosity; fermentation; GLP-1; ghrelin; PYY; leptin; insulin; satiety
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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MDPI and ACS Style

Schroeder, N.; Marquart, L.F.; Gallaher, D.D. The Role of Viscosity and Fermentability of Dietary Fibers on Satiety- and Adiposity-Related Hormones in Rats. Nutrients 2013, 5, 2093-2113.

AMA Style

Schroeder N, Marquart LF, Gallaher DD. The Role of Viscosity and Fermentability of Dietary Fibers on Satiety- and Adiposity-Related Hormones in Rats. Nutrients. 2013; 5(6):2093-2113.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Schroeder, Natalia; Marquart, Len F.; Gallaher, Daniel D. 2013. "The Role of Viscosity and Fermentability of Dietary Fibers on Satiety- and Adiposity-Related Hormones in Rats." Nutrients 5, no. 6: 2093-2113.


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