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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2011, 8(7), 3019-3031; doi:10.3390/ijerph8073019

Beneficial Effects of Ethanol Consumption on Insulin Resistance Are Only Applicable to Subjects Without Obesity or Insulin Resistance; Drinking is not Necessarily a Remedy for Metabolic Syndrome

Health Center, Keio University, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjukuku Tokyo 160-8582, Japan
Received: 1 June 2011 / Revised: 13 July 2011 / Accepted: 20 July 2011 / Published: 21 July 2011
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alcohol and Public Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [201 KB, 19 June 2014; original version 19 June 2014]

Abstract

Although moderate drinking has been shown to lower insulin resistance levels, it is still unclear whether alcoholic beverages could be remedies for insulin resistance. To elucidate this, the correlation between levels of ethanol consumption and insulin resistance were cross-sectionally examined in 371 non-diabetic male Japanese workers. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the ethanol consumption level was inversely correlated with the insulin resistance level assessed by homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR, p = 0.0014), the serum insulin level (p = 0.0007), and pancreatic β-cell function, also assessed by HOMA (HOMA-β, p = 0.0002), independently from age, body mass index (BMI), and blood pressure, liver function tests, and lipid profiles status, as well as serum adiponectin. The correlations were true in subjects with normal BMIs (up to 25.0 kg/m2, n = 301) or normal HOMA-IR (up to 2.0 µIU·mg/µL·dL n = 337), whereas all of them were non-significant in those with excessive BMIs (n = 70) or in those with HOMA-IR of more than 2.0 (n = 34). Although it is still unclear whether the reductions of these parameters by ethanol consumption are truly due to the improvement of insulin resistance, at least, these effects are not applicable to subjects with obesity and/or insulin resistance. Thus, alcoholic beverages could not be remedies for insulin resistance or metabolic syndrome. View Full-Text
Keywords: ethanol; insulin resistance; obesity; metabolic syndrome; adiponectin ethanol; insulin resistance; obesity; metabolic syndrome; adiponectin
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Yokoyama, H. Beneficial Effects of Ethanol Consumption on Insulin Resistance Are Only Applicable to Subjects Without Obesity or Insulin Resistance; Drinking is not Necessarily a Remedy for Metabolic Syndrome. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2011, 8, 3019-3031.

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