Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2010, 7(8), 3270-3297; doi:10.3390/ijerph7083270
Article

Do Questions Reflecting Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure from a Questionnaire Predict Direct Measure of Exposure in Owner-Occupied Houses?

1 University of Toronto, 1 King’s College Circle, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada 2 The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8, Canada 3 Health Canada, 269 Laurier Ave West, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9, Canada 4 Chemistry Department, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6, Canada 5 University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 2E5, Canada
* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 2 July 2010; in revised form: 14 August 2010 / Accepted: 18 August 2010 / Published: 23 August 2010
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Indoor Air Pollution and Human Health)
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Abstract: Home characteristic questions are used in epidemiological studies and clinical settings to assess potentially harmful exposures in the home. The objective of this study was to determine whether questionnaire-reported home characteristics can predict directly measured pollutants. Sixty home inspections were conducted on a subsample of the 2006 population-based Toronto Child Health Evaluation Questionnaire. Indoor/outdoor air and settled dust samples were analyzed. Mean Fel d 1 was higher (p < 0.0001) in homes with a cat (450.58 µg/g) versus without (22.28 µg/g). Mean indoor NO2 was higher (p = 0.003) in homes with gas stoves (14.98 ppb) versus without (8.31 ppb). Self-reported musty odours predicted higher glucan levels (10554.37 µg/g versus 6308.58 µg/g, p = 0.0077). Der f 1 was predicted by the home’s age, but not by reports of carpets, and was higher in homes with mean relative humidity > 50% (61.30 µg/g, versus 6.24 µg/g, p = 0.002). Self-reported presence of a cat, a gas stove, musty odours, mice, and the home’s age and indoor relative humidity over 50% predicted measured indoor levels of cat allergens, NO2, fungal glucan, mouse allergens and dust mite allergens, respectively. These results are helpful for understanding the significance of indoor exposures ascertained by self-reporting in large epidemiological studies and also in the clinical setting.
Keywords: allergens; environmental exposure; house dust; indoor air pollution; questionnaire

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MDPI and ACS Style

Loo, C.J.; Foty, R.G.; Wheeler, A.J.; Miller, J.D.; Evans, G.; Stieb, D.M.; Dell, S.D. Do Questions Reflecting Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure from a Questionnaire Predict Direct Measure of Exposure in Owner-Occupied Houses? Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2010, 7, 3270-3297.

AMA Style

Loo CJ, Foty RG, Wheeler AJ, Miller JD, Evans G, Stieb DM, Dell SD. Do Questions Reflecting Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure from a Questionnaire Predict Direct Measure of Exposure in Owner-Occupied Houses? International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2010; 7(8):3270-3297.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Loo, C.K. Jennifer; Foty, Richard G.; Wheeler, Amanda J.; Miller, J. David; Evans, Greg; Stieb, David M.; Dell, Sharon D. 2010. "Do Questions Reflecting Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure from a Questionnaire Predict Direct Measure of Exposure in Owner-Occupied Houses?" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 7, no. 8: 3270-3297.

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