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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2009, 6(3), 1282-1297; doi:10.3390/ijerph6031282
Article

Maternal Smoking,GSTM1 and GSTT1 Polymorphism and Susceptibility to Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

1,* , 1
, 2
 and 1
Received: 4 February 2009; Accepted: 21 March 2009 / Published: 26 March 2009
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tobacco Smoking and Public Health)
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Abstract: The objective of the study was to investigate the association between maternal smoking, GSTM1, GSTT1 polymorphism, low birth weight (LBW, < 2,500 g) and intra-uterine growth restriction (IUGR, < 2,500 g and gestation ≥ 37 weeks) risk. Within a prospective cohort study in Kaunas (Lithuania), a nested case-control study on LBW and IUGR occurrence among 646women with genotyping of GSTT1 and GSTM1 polymorphisms who delivered live singletons was conducted. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to study the association of maternal smoking and polymorphism in two genes metabolizing xenobiotics. Without consideration of genotype, light-smoking (mean 4.8 cigarettes/day) during pregnancy was associated with a small increase in LBW risk, adjusted OR 1.21; 95% CI 0.44 – 3.31. The corresponding odds for IUGR risk was 1.57; 95% CI 0.45 – 5.55. The findings suggested the greater LBW risk among light-smoking mothers with the GSTM1-null genotype (OR 1.91; 95% CI 0.43 – 8.47) compared to those with GSTM1-present genotype (OR 1.11; 95% CI 0.26 – 4.47). When both GSTM1 and GSTT1 genotypes were considered, the synergistic effect was found among smoking mothers: GSTT1-present and GSTM1-null genotype OR for LBW was 3.31; 95% CI 0.60-18.4 and that for IUGR was 2.47; 95% CI 0.31 – 13.1. However there was no statistically significant interaction between maternal smoking, GSTT1- present and GSTM1-null genotypes for LBW (OR 1.45; 95% CI 0.22 – 10.1, p = 0.66) and for IUGR (OR 1.10; 95% CI 0.10 – 12.6, p = 0.93).The results of this study suggested that smoking, even at a low-level, ought to be considered a potential risk factor for adverse birth outcomes and that genetic polymorphism may contribute to individual variation in tobacco smoke response.
Keywords: Tobacco smoking; GSTM1; GSTT1 polymorphism; low birth weight risk; fetal growth restriction Tobacco smoking; GSTM1; GSTT1 polymorphism; low birth weight risk; fetal growth restriction
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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MDPI and ACS Style

Grazuleviciene, R.; Danileviciute, A.; Nadisauskiene, R.; Vencloviene, J. Maternal Smoking,GSTM1 and GSTT1 Polymorphism and Susceptibility to Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2009, 6, 1282-1297.

AMA Style

Grazuleviciene R, Danileviciute A, Nadisauskiene R, Vencloviene J. Maternal Smoking,GSTM1 and GSTT1 Polymorphism and Susceptibility to Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2009; 6(3):1282-1297.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Grazuleviciene, Regina; Danileviciute, Asta; Nadisauskiene, Ruta; Vencloviene, Jone. 2009. "Maternal Smoking,GSTM1 and GSTT1 Polymorphism and Susceptibility to Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes." Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 6, no. 3: 1282-1297.



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