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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2009, 6(3), 1235-1253; doi:10.3390/ijerph6031235
Article

How the Mid-Victorians Worked, Ate and Died

1,*  and 2
Received: 9 February 2009; Accepted: 28 February 2009 / Published: 20 March 2009
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Public Health: Feature Papers)
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Abstract: Analysis of the mid-Victorian period in the U.K. reveals that life expectancy at age 5 was as good or better than exists today, and the incidence of degenerative disease was 10% of ours. Their levels of physical activity and hence calorific intakes were approximately twice ours. They had relatively little access to alcohol and tobacco; and due to their correspondingly high intake of fruits, whole grains, oily fish and vegetables, they consumed levels of micro- and phytonutrients at approximately ten times the levels considered normal today. This paper relates the nutritional status of the mid-Victorians to their freedom from degenerative disease; and extrapolates recommendations for the cost-effective improvement of public health today.
Keywords: Public health; dietary shift; degenerative disease; Victorian Public health; dietary shift; degenerative disease; Victorian
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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MDPI and ACS Style

Clayton, P.; Rowbotham, J. How the Mid-Victorians Worked, Ate and Died. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2009, 6, 1235-1253.

AMA Style

Clayton P, Rowbotham J. How the Mid-Victorians Worked, Ate and Died. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2009; 6(3):1235-1253.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Clayton, Paul; Rowbotham, Judith. 2009. "How the Mid-Victorians Worked, Ate and Died." Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 6, no. 3: 1235-1253.



Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert