Next Article in Journal
Model-Based Evaluation of Strategies to Control Brucellosis in China
Previous Article in Journal
Congenital Anomalies in Contaminated Sites: A Multisite Study in Italy
Previous Article in Special Issue
Perception of Policy and Environmental Action to Promote Healthy Behaviors in African American Communities
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(3), 293; doi:10.3390/ijerph14030293

Life after Stroke in an Urban Minority Population: A Photovoice Project

1
Division of Cardiology, New York University School of Medicine, 462 1st Avenue NBV 17S5, New York, NY 10016, USA
2
University of North Carolina School of Medicine, 321 S Columbia St, Chapel Hill, NC 27516, USA
3
Yale Institute for Network Science, Department of Sociology, Yale University, 17 Hillhouse Avenue, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
4
Department of Population Health Science and Policy, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 1468 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10029, USA
5
Zena and Michael A. Wiener Cardiovascular Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, One Gustave L. Levy Place, New York, NY 10029, USA
6
Center of Health Equity and Community Engaged Research at Mount Sinai, Department of Population Health Science and Policy, Icahn School at Mount Sinai, One Gustave L. Levy Place, New York, NY 10029, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Marinelle Payton and Felix A. Okojie
Received: 2 January 2017 / Revised: 23 February 2017 / Accepted: 27 February 2017 / Published: 11 March 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2718 KB, uploaded 14 March 2017]   |  

Abstract

Stroke is a leading cause of disability in the United States and disproportionately affects minority populations. We sought to explore the quality of life in urban, minority stroke survivors through their own photos and narratives. Using the Photovoice method, seventeen stroke survivors were instructed to take pictures reflecting their experience living with and recovering from stroke. Key photographs were discussed in detail; participants brainstormed ways to improve their lives and presented their work in clinical and community sites. Group discussions were recorded, transcribed, and coded transcripts were reviewed with written narratives to identify themes. Participants conveyed recovery from stroke in three stages: learning to navigate the initial physical and emotional impact of the stroke; coping with newfound physical and emotional barriers; and long-term adaptation to physical impairment and/or chronic disease. Participants navigated this stage-based model to varying degrees of success and identified barriers and facilitators to this process. Barriers included limited access for disabled and limited healthy food choices unique to the urban setting; facilitators included presence of social support and community engagement. Using Photovoice, diverse stroke survivors were able to identify common challenges in adapting to life after stroke and important factors for recovery of quality of life. View Full-Text
Keywords: photovoice; qualitative research; stroke; Black/African-American; Hispanic photovoice; qualitative research; stroke; Black/African-American; Hispanic
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Balakrishnan, R.; Kaplan, B.; Negron, R.; Fei, K.; Goldfinger, J.Z.; Horowitz, C.R. Life after Stroke in an Urban Minority Population: A Photovoice Project. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 293.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top