Next Article in Journal
Avoiding the Health Hazard of People from Construction Vehicles: A Strategy for Controlling the Vibration of a Wheel Loader
Next Article in Special Issue
Life after Stroke in an Urban Minority Population: A Photovoice Project
Previous Article in Journal
Long Non-Coding RNA as Potential Biomarker for Prostate Cancer: Is It Making a Difference?
Previous Article in Special Issue
Racial Disparities in Obesity Prevalence in Mississippi: Role of Socio-Demographic Characteristics and Physical Activity
Article Menu
Issue 3 (March) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(3), 271; doi:10.3390/ijerph14030271

Perception of Policy and Environmental Action to Promote Healthy Behaviors in African American Communities

1
Center of Excellence in Minority Health and Health Disparities, School of Public Health, Jackson State University, 350 West Woodrow Wilson Drive, Suite, 2280, Jackson, MS 39213, USA
2
Jackson Heart Study Community Outreach Center, School of Public Health, Jackson State University, 350 West Woodrow Wilson Drive, Suite, 2900B, Jackson, MS 39213, USA
3
Jackson Heart Study Graduate Training and Education Center, School of Public Health, Jackson State University, 350 West Woodrow Wilson Drive, Suite, 2900B, Jackson, MS 39213, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Peter Whittaker
Received: 1 February 2017 / Accepted: 3 March 2017 / Published: 7 March 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [250 KB, uploaded 8 March 2017]

Abstract

The present study aimed to examine the perceptions of African American communities regarding the involvement of political leaders in facilitating policy and environmental change promoting healthy eating and physical activity. We selected the Metro Jackson Area comprised of Hinds, Madison and Rankin Counties because it is a combination of urban and rural communities. The sample consisted of 70 participants from seven sites. A total of seven focus groups were asked to respond to one question to assess political leaders’ involvement in healthy living: “When you think about your political leaders that you have in the Jackson, Mississippi area, do any of them promote healthy eating and physical activity?” Focus groups consisted of six to 12 participants and were asked to comment on their participation in physical activity. The focus group interviews were digitally recorded. The recorded interviews were transcribed by a professional transcriptionist. Community members could not recollect much participation from political leaders in the health prevention/intervention efforts. In each of the counties, there was evidence that there was some involvement by local politicians in health promotion issues, but not on a large scale. In conclusion, making healthy foods and products available in neighborhood stores has long been associated with healthy behaviors and positive health outcomes. This can make a difference in the Mississippi communities where supermarkets are not accessible and health disparities abound. View Full-Text
Keywords: public health; disparities; policy; cardiovascular disease; African Americans public health; disparities; policy; cardiovascular disease; African Americans
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Addison, C.; Jenkins, B.W.C.; White, M.; Henderson, F.; McGill, D.J.; Antoine-LaVigne, D.; Payton, M. Perception of Policy and Environmental Action to Promote Healthy Behaviors in African American Communities. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 271.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top