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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(2), 197; doi:10.3390/ijerph14020197

Prospective Prediction of Juvenile Homicide/Attempted Homicide among Early-Onset Juvenile Offenders

1
G4S Youth Services, LLC, Tampa, FL 33634, USA
2
Department of Criminal Justice, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York, New York, NY 10019, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Matt DeLisi
Received: 30 January 2017 / Revised: 11 February 2017 / Accepted: 14 February 2017 / Published: 16 February 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Psychology and Crime)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [272 KB, uploaded 16 February 2017]

Abstract

While homicide perpetrated by juveniles is a relatively rare occurrence, between 2010 and 2014, approximately 7%–8% of all murders involved a juvenile offender. Unfortunately, few studies have prospectively examined the predictors of homicide offending, with none examining first-time murder among a sample of adjudicated male and female youth. The current study employed data on 5908 juvenile offenders (70% male, 45% Black) first arrested at the age of 12 or younger to prospectively examine predictors of an arrest for homicide/attempted homicide by the age of 18. Among these early-onset offenders, males, Black youth, those living in households with family members with a history of mental illness, those engaging in self-mutilation, and those with elevated levels of anger/aggression (all measured by age 13) were more likely to be arrested for homicide/attempted homicide by age 18. These findings add to the scant scientific literature on the predictors of homicide, and illustrate potential avenues for intervention. View Full-Text
Keywords: homicide; murder; juvenile offending; violence homicide; murder; juvenile offending; violence
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Baglivio, M.T.; Wolff, K.T. Prospective Prediction of Juvenile Homicide/Attempted Homicide among Early-Onset Juvenile Offenders. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 197.

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