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Special Issue "Youth Psychology and Crime"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Matt DeLisi

Department of Sociology, Iowa State University, 203A East Hall, Ames, IA 50011, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1-515-294-8008
Fax: +1-515-294-2303
Interests: criminal careers; psychopathy; biosocial criminology; temperament; personality; homicide; criminal justice

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue on youth psychology and crime in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The venue is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health. For detailed information on the journal, we refer you to http://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph.

The Special Issue focuses on psychological constructs and adolescent antisocial behavior broadly conceptualized. Contributors from criminology, criminal justice, psychology, psychiatry, sociology, genetics, public health, and allied fields are welcome. The scholarly goal is to advance understanding of the psychological mechanisms associated with crime and antisocial conduct among youth.  

This Special Issue is open to any subject area related to the impacts of youth psychology and crime/antisocial behavior. The listed keywords suggest just a few of the many possibilities.

Prof. Dr. Matt DeLisi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Delinquency
  • Crime
  • Conduct problems
  • Antisocial behavior
  • Juvenile psychopathy
  • Developmental psychopathology

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Stock Market Fluctuations and Self-Harm among Children and Adolescents in Hong Kong
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(6), 623; doi:10.3390/ijerph14060623
Received: 31 March 2017 / Revised: 22 May 2017 / Accepted: 31 May 2017 / Published: 9 June 2017
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Abstract
Although a few studies investigated the impact of stock market fluctuations on population health, the question of whether stock market fluctuations have an impact on self-harm in children and adolescents remain unanswered. This study therefore investigated the association between stock market fluctuations and
[...] Read more.
Although a few studies investigated the impact of stock market fluctuations on population health, the question of whether stock market fluctuations have an impact on self-harm in children and adolescents remain unanswered. This study therefore investigated the association between stock market fluctuations and self-harm among children and adolescents in Hong Kong. Daily self-harm attendance records were retrieved from all 18 local Accident and Emergency Departments (AED) from 2001 to 2012. 4931 children and adolescents who committed self-harm were included. The results indicated positive correlation between daily change in stock market index, Hang Seng Index (∇HSI, per 300 points), and daily self-harm incident risk of children and adolescents, without time lag between the two. The incident risk ratio for ∇HSI was 1.09 (p = 0.0339) in children and 1.06 (p = 0.0246) in adolescents. Importantly, non-trading days were found to impose significant protective effect in both groups against self-harm risk. Our results showed that stock market fluctuations were related to self-harm behaviors in children and adolescents. Parents and professionals should be educated about the potential harm of stock market fluctuations and the importance of effective parenting in reducing self-harm among children and adolescents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Psychology and Crime)
Open AccessArticle Adverse Childhood Experiences, Commitment Offense, and Race/Ethnicity: Are the Effects Crime-, Race-, and Ethnicity-Specific?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(3), 331; doi:10.3390/ijerph14030331
Received: 13 February 2017 / Revised: 10 March 2017 / Accepted: 19 March 2017 / Published: 22 March 2017
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (289 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Adverse childhood experiences are associated with an array of health, psychiatric, and behavioral problems including antisocial behavior. Criminologists have recently utilized adverse childhood experiences as an organizing research framework and shown that adverse childhood experiences are associated with delinquency, violence, and more chronic/severe
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Adverse childhood experiences are associated with an array of health, psychiatric, and behavioral problems including antisocial behavior. Criminologists have recently utilized adverse childhood experiences as an organizing research framework and shown that adverse childhood experiences are associated with delinquency, violence, and more chronic/severe criminal careers. However, much less is known about adverse childhood experiences vis-à-vis specific forms of crime and whether the effects vary across race and ethnicity. Using a sample of 2520 male confined juvenile delinquents, the current study used epidemiological tables of odds (both unadjusted and adjusted for onset, total adjudications, and total out of home placements) to evaluate the significance of the number of adverse childhood experiences on commitment for homicide, sexual assault, and serious persons/property offending. The effects of adverse childhood experiences vary considerably across racial and ethnic groups and across offense types. Adverse childhood experiences are strongly and positively associated with sexual offending, but negatively associated with homicide and serious person/property offending. Differential effects of adverse childhood experiences were also seen among African Americans, Hispanics, and whites. Suggestions for future research to clarify the mechanisms by which adverse childhood experiences manifest in specific forms of criminal behavior are offered. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Psychology and Crime)
Open AccessArticle Prospective Prediction of Juvenile Homicide/Attempted Homicide among Early-Onset Juvenile Offenders
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(2), 197; doi:10.3390/ijerph14020197
Received: 30 January 2017 / Revised: 11 February 2017 / Accepted: 14 February 2017 / Published: 16 February 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (272 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
While homicide perpetrated by juveniles is a relatively rare occurrence, between 2010 and 2014, approximately 7%–8% of all murders involved a juvenile offender. Unfortunately, few studies have prospectively examined the predictors of homicide offending, with none examining first-time murder among a sample of
[...] Read more.
While homicide perpetrated by juveniles is a relatively rare occurrence, between 2010 and 2014, approximately 7%–8% of all murders involved a juvenile offender. Unfortunately, few studies have prospectively examined the predictors of homicide offending, with none examining first-time murder among a sample of adjudicated male and female youth. The current study employed data on 5908 juvenile offenders (70% male, 45% Black) first arrested at the age of 12 or younger to prospectively examine predictors of an arrest for homicide/attempted homicide by the age of 18. Among these early-onset offenders, males, Black youth, those living in households with family members with a history of mental illness, those engaging in self-mutilation, and those with elevated levels of anger/aggression (all measured by age 13) were more likely to be arrested for homicide/attempted homicide by age 18. These findings add to the scant scientific literature on the predictors of homicide, and illustrate potential avenues for intervention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Psychology and Crime)
Open AccessArticle The Effects of a Skill-Based Intervention for Victims of Bullying in Brazil
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(11), 1042; doi:10.3390/ijerph13111042
Received: 28 July 2016 / Revised: 26 September 2016 / Accepted: 19 October 2016 / Published: 26 October 2016
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Abstract
This study’s objective was to verify whether improved social and emotional skills would reduce victimization among Brazilian 6th grade student victims of bullying. The targets of this intervention were victimized students; a total of 78 victims participated. A cognitive-behavioral intervention based on social
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This study’s objective was to verify whether improved social and emotional skills would reduce victimization among Brazilian 6th grade student victims of bullying. The targets of this intervention were victimized students; a total of 78 victims participated. A cognitive-behavioral intervention based on social and emotional skills was held in eight weekly sessions. The sessions focused on civility, the ability to make friends, self-control, emotional expressiveness, empathy, assertiveness, and interpersonal problem-solving capacity. Data were analyzed through Poisson regression models with random effects. Pre- and post-analyses reveal that intervention and comparison groups presented significant reduced victimization by bullying. No significant improvement was found in regard to difficulties in practicing social skills. Victimization reduction cannot be attributed to the program. This study contributes to the incipient literature addressing anti-bullying interventions conducted in developing countries and highlights the need for approaches that do not exclusively focus on the students’ individual aspects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Psychology and Crime)
Open AccessArticle Psychometric Properties and Clinical Usefulness of the Youth Self-Report DSM-Oriented Scales: A Field Study among Detained Male Adolescents
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(9), 932; doi:10.3390/ijerph13090932
Received: 30 June 2016 / Revised: 6 September 2016 / Accepted: 8 September 2016 / Published: 21 September 2016
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Abstract
It is unknown if the DSM-oriented (DSM) scales of the Youth Self-Report (YSR) are useful to determine what kind of narrowly-focused psychiatric assessment is needed, and how well these scales serve as a triage tool in real-world forensic settings. To address this knowledge
[...] Read more.
It is unknown if the DSM-oriented (DSM) scales of the Youth Self-Report (YSR) are useful to determine what kind of narrowly-focused psychiatric assessment is needed, and how well these scales serve as a triage tool in real-world forensic settings. To address this knowledge gap, the YSR and diagnostic interviews were administered to 405 detained boys as part of a clinical protocol. Continuous DSM scale scores (e.g., Conduct Problems) were moderately to highly accurate in predicting their corresponding disorder (e.g., conduct disorder), whereas dichotomized DSM scale scores were not. To test the DSM scales’ usefulness for triage purposes, the sensitivity and specificity of being in the borderline range of one or more DSM scales were calculated. Almost all boys who did not have a disorder were in the normal range of at least one DSM scale (high specificity). However, many boys with a disorder would have been missed if such a decision rule was used for triage purposes (low sensitivity). In conclusion, their relations with the corresponding disorders support the construct validity of the DSM scales in an applied forensic setting. Nevertheless, the findings also warrant against the use of these scales for planning further narrowly-focused assessment or for triage purposes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Psychology and Crime)
Open AccessArticle The Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory: Measurement Invariance and Psychometric Properties among Portuguese Youths
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(9), 852; doi:10.3390/ijerph13090852
Received: 27 May 2016 / Revised: 5 August 2016 / Accepted: 22 August 2016 / Published: 26 August 2016
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (329 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory (YPI) among a mixed-gender sample of 782 Portuguese youth (M = 15.87 years; SD = 1.72), in a school context. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed the
[...] Read more.
The aim of the present study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory (YPI) among a mixed-gender sample of 782 Portuguese youth (M = 15.87 years; SD = 1.72), in a school context. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed the expected three-factor first-order structure. Cross-gender measurement invariance and cross-sample measurement invariance using a forensic sample of institutionalized males were also confirmed. The Portuguese version of the YPI demonstrated generally adequate psychometric properties of internal consistency, mean inter-item correlation, convergent validity, discriminant validity, and criterion-related validity of statistically significant associations with conduct disorder symptoms, alcohol abuse, drug use, and unprotected sex. In terms of known-groups validity, males scored higher than females, and males from the school sample scored lower than institutionalized males. The use of the YPI among the Portuguese male and female youth population is psychometrically justified, and it can be a useful measure to identify adolescents with high levels of psychopathic traits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Psychology and Crime)
Open AccessArticle Childhood Reports of Food Neglect and Impulse Control Problems and Violence in Adulthood
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(4), 389; doi:10.3390/ijerph13040389
Received: 22 February 2016 / Revised: 24 March 2016 / Accepted: 28 March 2016 / Published: 30 March 2016
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (469 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Food insecurity and hunger during childhood are associated with an array of developmental problems in multiple domains, including impulse control problems and violence. Unfortunately, extant research is based primarily on small convenience samples and an epidemiological assessment of the hunger-violence link is lacking.
[...] Read more.
Food insecurity and hunger during childhood are associated with an array of developmental problems in multiple domains, including impulse control problems and violence. Unfortunately, extant research is based primarily on small convenience samples and an epidemiological assessment of the hunger-violence link is lacking. The current study employed data from Wave 1 (2001–2002) and Wave 2 (2004–2005) of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). The NESARC is a nationally representative sample of non-institutionalized U.S. residents aged 18 years and older. Participants who experienced frequent hunger during childhood had significantly greater impulsivity, worse self-control, and greater involvement in several forms of interpersonal violence. These effects were stronger among whites, Hispanics, and males. The findings support general theoretical models implicating impulse control problems as a key correlate of crime and violence and add another facet to the importance of ameliorating food neglect in the United States. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Psychology and Crime)
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