Next Article in Journal
Self-Certified Sickness Absence among Young Municipal Employees—Changes from 2002 to 2016 and Occupational Class Differences
Next Article in Special Issue
Pattern of Road Traffic Injuries in Rural Bangladesh: Burden Estimates and Risk Factors
Previous Article in Journal
Prevalence and Correlates of Physical Inactivity during Leisure-Time and Commuting among Beneficiaries of Government Welfare Assistance in Poland
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Burden of Suicide in Rural Bangladesh: Magnitude and Risk Factors
Article Menu
Issue 10 (October) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(10), 1130; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14101130

Developmental Assessments during Injury Research: Is Enrollment of Very Young Children in Crèches Associated with Better Scores?

1
Department of International Health, International Injury Research Unit, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
2
IDinsight, 24/1 Hauz Khas Village, New Delhi 110021, India
3
International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, GPO Box 128, Dhaka 1000, Bangladesh
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 11 July 2017 / Revised: 18 September 2017 / Accepted: 18 September 2017 / Published: 26 September 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [321 KB, uploaded 26 September 2017]

Abstract

The Developmental Study is part of a larger intervention on “saving of lives from drowning (SoLiD)” where children were enrolled either into crèches (daycare centers) or playpens to prevent drowning in rural Bangladesh. Sampling ~1000 children between the ages of 9–17 months, we compared problem-solving, communication, motor and personal-social outcomes assessed by the Ages and Stages Questionnaire in the two interventions. After controlling for variables such as home stimulation in multivariate regressions, children in crèches performed about a quarter of a standard deviation better in total scores (p < 0.10) and 0.45 standard deviations higher in fine motor skills (p < 0.05). Moreover, once the sample was stratified by length of exposure to the intervention, then children in crèches performed significantly better in a number of domains: those enrolled the longest (about 5 months) have higher fine motor (1.47, p < 0.01), gross motor (0.40, p < 0.05) and personal-social skills (0.95, p < 0.01) than children in playpens. In addition, children in crèches with the longer exposure (about 5 months) have significantly higher personal-social and problem-solving scores than those in crèches with minimum exposure. Enrollment in crèches of very young children may be positively associated with psychosocial scores after accounting for important confounding variables. View Full-Text
Keywords: cognitive; psychosocial; crèche; daycare; child development; Bangladesh; Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ); early childhood development (ECD); early childhood care (ECC) cognitive; psychosocial; crèche; daycare; child development; Bangladesh; Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ); early childhood development (ECD); early childhood care (ECC)
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Nair, D.; Alonge, O.; Derakhshani Hamadani, J.; Sharmin Salam, S.; Islam, I.; Hyder, A.A. Developmental Assessments during Injury Research: Is Enrollment of Very Young Children in Crèches Associated with Better Scores? Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 1130.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top