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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(11), 1354; doi:10.3390/ijerph14111354

Pattern of Road Traffic Injuries in Rural Bangladesh: Burden Estimates and Risk Factors

1
Center for Injury Prevention and Research, Bangladesh, House # B-162, Road # 23, New DOHS, Mohakhali, Dhaka 1206, Bangladesh
2
Department of International Health, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 5 September 2017 / Revised: 1 November 2017 / Accepted: 2 November 2017 / Published: 7 November 2017
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Abstract

Globally, road traffic injury (RTI) causes 1.3 million deaths annually. Almost 90% of all RTI deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries. RTI is one of the leading causes of death in Bangladesh; the World Health Organization estimated that it kills over 21,000 people in the country annually. This study describes the current magnitude and risk factors of RTI for different age groups in rural Bangladesh. A household census was carried out in 51 unions of seven sub-districts situated in the north and central part of Bangladesh between June and November 2013, covering 1.2 million individuals. Trained data collectors collected information on fatal and nonfatal RTI events through face-to-face interviews using a set of structured pre-tested questionnaires. The recall periods for fatal and non-fatal RTI were one year and six months, respectively. The mortality and morbidity rates due to RTI were 6.8/100,000 population/year and 889/100,000 populations/six months, respectively. RTI mortality and morbidity rates were significantly higher among males compared to females. Deaths and morbidities due to RTI were highest among those in the 25–64 years age group. A higher proportion of morbidity occurred among vehicle passengers (34%) and pedestrians (18%), and more than one-third of the RTI mortality occurred among pedestrians. Twenty percent of all nonfatal RTIs were classified as severe injuries. RTI is a major public health issue in rural Bangladesh. Immediate attention is needed to reduce preventable deaths and morbidities in rural Bangladesh. View Full-Text
Keywords: road traffic injuries; risk factors; epidemiology; Bangladesh road traffic injuries; risk factors; epidemiology; Bangladesh
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ul Baset, M.K.; Rahman, A.; Alonge, O.; Agrawal, P.; Wadhwaniya, S.; Rahman, F. Pattern of Road Traffic Injuries in Rural Bangladesh: Burden Estimates and Risk Factors. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 1354.

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