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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(6), 5886-5904; doi:10.3390/ijerph120605886

Assessment of Electromagnetic Interference with Active Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices (CIEDs) Caused by the Qi A13 Design Wireless Charging Board

The Research Center for Bioelectromagnetic Interaction (FEMU), Institute and Out-patient Clinic of Occupational Medicine, RWTH Aachen University, Pauwelsstr 30, 52074 Aachen, Germany
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Martin Röösli
Received: 24 March 2015 / Revised: 12 May 2015 / Accepted: 22 May 2015 / Published: 27 May 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electromagnetic Fields and Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1998 KB, uploaded 27 May 2015]   |  

Abstract

Electromagnetic interference is a concern for people wearing cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). The aim of this study was to assess the electromagnetic compatibility between CIEDs and the magnetic field of a common wireless charging technology. To do so the voltage induced in CIEDs by Qi A13 design magnetic fields were measured and compared with the performance limits set by ISO 14117. In order to carry this out a measuring circuit was developed which can be connected with unipolar or bipolar pacemaker leads. The measuring system was positioned at the four most common implantation sites in a torso phantom filled with physiological saline solution. The phantom was exposed by using Helmholtz coils from 5 µT to 27 µT with 111 kHz sine‑bursts or by using a Qi A13 design wireless charging board (Qi‑A13‑Board) in two operating modes “power transfer” and “pinging”. With the Helmholtz coils the lowest magnetic flux density at which the performance limit was exceeded is 11 µT. With the Qi‑A13‑Board in power transfer mode 10.8% and in pinging mode 45.7% (2.2% at 10 cm distance) of the performance limit were reached at maximum. In neither of the scrutinized cases, did the voltage induced by the Qi‑A13‑Board exceed the performance limits. View Full-Text
Keywords: intermediate frequency magnetic fields; pacemaker; defibrillator; electromagnetic interference; wireless charging; wireless power transfer; Qi A13 design; performance limits; EMF risk assessment intermediate frequency magnetic fields; pacemaker; defibrillator; electromagnetic interference; wireless charging; wireless power transfer; Qi A13 design; performance limits; EMF risk assessment
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Seckler, T.; Jagielski, K.; Stunder, D. Assessment of Electromagnetic Interference with Active Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices (CIEDs) Caused by the Qi A13 Design Wireless Charging Board. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 5886-5904.

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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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