Next Article in Journal
Incorporation of Spatial Interactions in Location Networks to Identify Critical Geo-Referenced Routes for Assessing Disease Control Measures on a Large-Scale Campus
Previous Article in Journal
Combined Effects of Nonylphenol and Bisphenol A on the Human Prostate Epithelial Cell Line RWPE-1
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(4), 4156-4169; doi:10.3390/ijerph120404156

CHRNA3 rs6495308 Genotype as an Effect Modifier of the Association between Daily Cigarette Consumption and Hypertension in Chinese Male Smokers

1
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510080, China
2
Guangdong Prevention and Treatment Center for Occupational Diseases, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510000, China
3
Guangdong Provincial Institute of Public Health, Guangdong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510000, China
4
Division of Behavioral Medicine, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, NY 14228, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 9 March 2015 / Revised: 5 April 2015 / Accepted: 9 April 2015 / Published: 14 April 2015
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [741 KB, uploaded 14 April 2015]   |  

Abstract

Cigarette smoking is an important risk factor for hypertension. However, the effects on hypertension of the interaction between smoking and the genotype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene are unclear. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the CHRNA3 rs6495308 genotype affects the association between daily cigarette consumption and hypertension. We recruited 947 male smokers in southern China and used a questionnaire administered in face to face interviews to obtain information on their socio-demographic characteristics and smoking behavior. Blood samples were collected to test for CHRNA3 rs6495308 genotype variations. Three blood-pressure measurements were taken for each participant, and the average values recorded. We found that, compared with light smoking (<15 cigarettes per day), heavy smoking (≥15 cigarettes per day) yielded a greater risk of hypertension. We also observed that the interaction between daily cigarette consumption and the CHRNA3 rs6495308 genotype may affect hypertension. Heavy smokers with the homozygous mutant CHRNA3 rs6495308 genotype exhibited a significantly greater risk of hypertension than light smokers with wild-type CHRNA3 rs6495308 genotypes. The positive interaction between heavy smoking and the homozygous mutant CHRNA3 rs6495308 genotype was found to affect the likelihood of hypertension in Chinese male smokers. View Full-Text
Keywords: cigarette smoking; nicotine acetylcholine receptor; genotype; hypertension cigarette smoking; nicotine acetylcholine receptor; genotype; hypertension
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Wu, X.-Y.; Zhou, S.-Y.; Niu, Z.-Z.; Liu, T.; Xie, C.-B.; Chen, W.-Q. CHRNA3 rs6495308 Genotype as an Effect Modifier of the Association between Daily Cigarette Consumption and Hypertension in Chinese Male Smokers. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 4156-4169.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top