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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(11), 13779-13793; doi:10.3390/ijerph121113779

Commercial Honeybush (Cyclopia spp.) Tea Extract Inhibits Osteoclast Formation and Bone Resorption in RAW264.7 Murine Macrophages—An in vitro Study

1
Department of Physiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0001, South Africa
2
School of Food and Nutrition, Massey Institute for Food Science and Technology, Massey University, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand
3
Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0001, South Africa
4
Institute for Food, Nutrition and Well-being, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0001, South Africa
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Paul B. Tchounwou and Dietmar Knopp
Received: 6 August 2015 / Revised: 19 October 2015 / Accepted: 21 October 2015 / Published: 28 October 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bone Health: Nutritional Perspectives)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [707 KB, uploaded 28 October 2015]   |  

Abstract

Honeybush tea, a sweet tasting caffeine-free tea that is indigenous to South Africa, is rich in bioactive compounds that may have beneficial health effects. Bone remodeling is a physiological process that involves the synthesis of bone matrix by osteoblasts and resorption of bone by osteoclasts. When resorption exceeds formation, bone remodeling can be disrupted resulting in bone diseases such as osteoporosis. Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells derived from hematopoietic precursors of monocytic lineage. These precursors fuse and differentiate into mature osteoclasts in the presence of receptor activator of NF-kB ligand (RANKL), produced by osteoblasts. In this study, the in vitro effects of an aqueous extract of fermented honeybush tea were examined on osteoclast formation and bone resorption in RAW264.7 murine macrophages. We found that commercial honeybush tea extract inhibited osteoclast formation and TRAP activity which was accompanied by reduced bone resorption and disruption of characteristic cytoskeletal elements of mature osteoclasts without cytotoxicity. Furthermore, honeybush tea extract decreased expression of key osteoclast specific genes, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin K. This study demonstrates for the first time that honeybush tea may have potential anti-osteoclastogenic effects and therefore should be further explored for its beneficial effects on bone. View Full-Text
Keywords: honeybush tea; osteoclast; bone resorption; RANKL; RAW264.7 murine macrophages honeybush tea; osteoclast; bone resorption; RANKL; RAW264.7 murine macrophages
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Visagie, A.; Kasonga, A.; Deepak, V.; Moosa, S.; Marais, S.; Kruger, M.C.; Coetzee, M. Commercial Honeybush (Cyclopia spp.) Tea Extract Inhibits Osteoclast Formation and Bone Resorption in RAW264.7 Murine Macrophages—An in vitro Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 13779-13793.

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