Next Article in Journal
Factors Contributing to the Risk of HIV Infection in Rural School-Going Adolescents
Previous Article in Journal
Odor and VOC Emissions from Pan Frying of Mackerel at Three Stages: Raw, Well-Done, and Charred
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(11), 11772-11804; doi:10.3390/ijerph111111772

Non-Accidental Health Impacts of Wildfire Smoke

1
Department of Epidemiology of Respiratory and Allergic Disease (EPAR), UMR-S 1136, Institute Pierre Louis of Epidemiology and Public Health, National Institute for Health and Medical Research (INSERM), 27 Rue Chaligny, 75012 Paris, France
2
Department of Epidemiology of Respiratory and Allergic Disease (EPAR), UMR-S 1136, Institute Pierre Louis of Epidemiology and Public Health, University Pierre and Marie Curie (UPMC)—Sorbonne University, 27 Rue Chaligny, 75012 Paris, France
3
Laboratory of Aerology, National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), University of Toulouse, 14 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse, France
4
Environmental Epidemiology Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, P.O. Box 95, FI-70701 Kuopio, Finland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 25 July 2014 / Revised: 23 October 2014 / Accepted: 29 October 2014 / Published: 14 November 2014
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [802 KB, uploaded 14 November 2014]   |  

Abstract

Wildfires take a heavy toll on human health worldwide. Climate change may increase the risk of wildfire frequency. Therefore, in view of adapted preventive actions, there is an urgent need to further understand the health effects and public awareness of wildfires. We conducted a systematic review of non-accidental health impacts of wildfire and incorporated lessons learned from recent experiences. Based on the literature, various studies have established the relationship between one of the major components of wildfire, particulate matter (particles with diameter less than 10 µm (PM10) and less than 2.5 µm (PM2.5)) and cardiorespiratory symptoms in terms of Emergency Rooms visits and hospital admissions. Associations between wildfire emissions and various subclinical effects have also been established. However, few relationships between wildfire emissions and mortality have been observed. Certain segments of the population may be particularly vulnerable to smoke-related health risks. Among them, people with pre-existing cardiopulmonary conditions, the elderly, smokers and, for professional reasons, firefighters. Potential action mechanisms have been highlighted. Overall, more research is needed to better understand health impact of wildfire exposure. View Full-Text
Keywords: wildfires emissions; wildfire exposure; health impact; cardiorespiratory disease; particulate matter wildfires emissions; wildfire exposure; health impact; cardiorespiratory disease; particulate matter
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Youssouf, H.; Liousse, C.; Roblou, L.; Assamoi, E.-M.; Salonen, R.O.; Maesano, C.; Banerjee, S.; Annesi-Maesano, I. Non-Accidental Health Impacts of Wildfire Smoke. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11, 11772-11804.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top