Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(3), 950-962; doi:10.3390/ijerph10030950
Article

A Multi-Site Study on Knowledge, Attitudes, Beliefs and Practice of Child-Dog Interactions in Rural China

1 Department of Psychology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1300 University Blvd., CH 415, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA 2 School of Public Health Management, Anhui Medical University, 81 Meishan Road, Hefei, Anhui 230032, China 3 Center for Injury Research and Policy, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, 700 Children's Drive, Columbus, OH 43205, USA 4 School of Public Health, Hebei United University, 46 West Xinhua Road, Tangshan, Hebei 063009, China 5 Ningbo Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 237 Yongfeng Road, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315010, China
* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 16 January 2013; in revised form: 25 February 2013 / Accepted: 27 February 2013 / Published: 7 March 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child Injury Prevention)
PDF Full-text Download PDF Full-Text [271 KB, uploaded 7 March 2013 09:59 CET]
Abstract: This study examines demographic, cognitive and behavioral factors that predict pediatric dog-bite injury risk in rural China. A total of 1,537 children (grades 4–6) in rural regions of Anhui, Hebei and Zhejiang Provinces, China completed self-report questionnaires assessing beliefs about and behaviors with dogs. The results showed that almost 30% of children reported a history of dog bites. Children answered 56% of dog-safety knowledge items correctly. Regressions revealed both demographic and cognitive/behavioral factors predicted children’s risky interactions with dogs and dog-bite history. Boys behaved more riskily with dogs and were more frequently bitten. Older children reported greater risks with dogs and more bites. With demographics controlled, attitudes/beliefs of invulnerability, exposure frequency, and dog ownership predicted children’s self-reported risky practice with dogs. Attitudes/beliefs of invulnerability, dog exposure, and dog ownership predicted dog bites. In conclusion, both demographic and cognitive/behavioral factors influenced rural Chinese children’s dog-bite injury risk. Theory-based, empirically-supported intervention programs might reduce dog-bite injuries in rural China.
Keywords: dog bites; injury; safety; China; rural health

Article Statistics

Load and display the download statistics.

Citations to this Article

Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Shen, J.; Li, S.; Xiang, H.; Pang, S.; Xu, G.; Schwebel, D.C. A Multi-Site Study on Knowledge, Attitudes, Beliefs and Practice of Child-Dog Interactions in Rural China. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10, 950-962.

AMA Style

Shen J, Li S, Xiang H, Pang S, Xu G, Schwebel DC. A Multi-Site Study on Knowledge, Attitudes, Beliefs and Practice of Child-Dog Interactions in Rural China. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2013; 10(3):950-962.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Shen, Jiabin; Li, Shaohua; Xiang, Huiyun; Pang, Shulan; Xu, Guozhang; Schwebel, David C. 2013. "A Multi-Site Study on Knowledge, Attitudes, Beliefs and Practice of Child-Dog Interactions in Rural China." Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 10, no. 3: 950-962.

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert