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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(3), 1113-1124; doi:10.3390/ijerph10031113
Article

Disseminating Childhood Home Injury Risk Reduction Information in Pakistan: Results from a Community-Based Pilot Study

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1 International Injury Research Unit (IIRU), Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA 2 Department of Emergency Medicine, Aga Khan University, Karachi 74800, Pakistan
* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 25 January 2013 / Revised: 7 March 2013 / Accepted: 7 March 2013 / Published: 15 March 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child Injury Prevention)
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Abstract

Background: Most childhood unintentional injuries occur in the home; however, very little home injury prevention information is tailored to developing countries. Utilizing our previously developed information dissemination tools and a hazard assessment checklist tailored to a low-income neighborhood in Pakistan, we pilot tested and compared the effectiveness of two dissemination tools. Methods: Two low-income neighborhoods were mapped, identifying families with a child aged between 12 and 59 months. In June and July 2010, all enrolled households underwent a home hazard assessment at the same time hazard reduction education was being given using an in-home tutorial or a pamphlet. A follow up assessment was conducted 4–5 months later. Results: 503 households were enrolled; 256 received a tutorial and 247 a pamphlet. The two groups differed significantly (p < 0.01) in level of maternal education and relationship of the child to the primary caregiver. However, when controlling for these variables, those receiving an in-home tutorial had a higher odds of hazard reduction than the pamphlet group for uncovered vats of water (OR 2.14, 95% CI: 1.28, 3.58), an open fire within reach of the child (OR 3.55, 95% CI: 1.80, 7.00), and inappropriately labeled cooking fuel containers (OR 1.86, 95% CI: 1.07, 3.25). Conclusions: This pilot project demonstrates the potential utility of using home-visit tutorials to decrease home hazards in a low-income neighborhood in Pakistan. A longer-term randomized study is needed to assess actual effectiveness of the use of allied health workers for home-based injury education and whether this results in decreased home injuries.
Keywords: unintentional injuries; home injuries; children; accidents; trauma; home visits; Pakistan unintentional injuries; home injuries; children; accidents; trauma; home visits; Pakistan
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).
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Chandran, A.; Khan, U.R.; Zia, N.; Feroze, A.; de Ramirez, S.S.; Huang, C.-M.; Razzak, J.A.; Hyder, A.A. Disseminating Childhood Home Injury Risk Reduction Information in Pakistan: Results from a Community-Based Pilot Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10, 1113-1124.

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