Sensors 2008, 8(5), 3497-3541; doi:10.3390/s8053497
Review

Measurement of Mechanical Properties of Cantilever Shaped Materials

1,* email, 2,3email and 2,3email
Received: 17 April 2008; Accepted: 18 May 2008 / Published: 26 May 2008
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract: Microcantilevers were first introduced as imaging probes in Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) due to their extremely high sensitivity in measuring surface forces. The versatility of these probes, however, allows the sensing and measurement of a host of mechanical properties of various materials. Sensor parameters such as resonance frequency, quality factor, amplitude of vibration and bending due to a differential stress can all be simultaneously determined for a cantilever. When measuring the mechanical properties of materials, identifying and discerning the most influential parameters responsible for the observed changes in the cantilever response are important. We will, therefore, discuss the effects of various force fields such as those induced by mass loading, residual stress, internal friction of the material, and other changes in the mechanical properties of the microcantilevers. Methods to measure variations in temperature, pressure, or molecular adsorption of water molecules are also discussed. Often these effects occur simultaneously, increasing the number of parameters that need to be concurrently measured to ensure the reliability of the sensors. We therefore systematically investigate the geometric and environmental effects on cantilever measurements including the chemical nature of the underlying interactions. To address the geometric effects we have considered cantilevers with a rectangular or circular cross section. The chemical nature is addressed by using cantilevers fabricated with metals and/or dielectrics. Selective chemical etching, swelling or changes in Young’s modulus of the surface were investigated by means of polymeric and inorganic coatings. Finally to address the effect of the environment in which the cantilever operates, the Knudsen number was determined to characterize the molecule-cantilever collisions. Also bimaterial cantilevers with high thermal sensitivity were used to discern the effect of temperature variations. When appropriate, we use continuum mechanics, which is justified according to the ratio between the cantilever thickness and the grain size of the materials. We will also address other potential applications such as the ageing process of nuclear materials, building materials, and optical fibers, which can be investigated by monitoring their mechanical changes with time. In summary, by virtue of the dynamic response of a miniaturized cantilever shaped material, we present useful measurements of the associated elastic properties.
Keywords: Microcantilever; mechanics; ageing; environment; stress; gas; materials; sensor; pressure; temperature
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MDPI and ACS Style

Finot, E.; Passian, A.; Thundat, T. Measurement of Mechanical Properties of Cantilever Shaped Materials. Sensors 2008, 8, 3497-3541.

AMA Style

Finot E, Passian A, Thundat T. Measurement of Mechanical Properties of Cantilever Shaped Materials. Sensors. 2008; 8(5):3497-3541.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Finot, Eric; Passian, Ali; Thundat, Thomas. 2008. "Measurement of Mechanical Properties of Cantilever Shaped Materials." Sensors 8, no. 5: 3497-3541.

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