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Sensors 2007, 7(10), 2419-2429; doi:10.3390/s7102419
Article

Shapes of Differential Pulse Voltammograms and Level of Metallothionein at Different Animal Species

1, 3, 3, 4, 4 and 1,*
1 Department of Chemistry and BiochemistryMendel University of Agriculture and Forestry, Zemedelska 1, CZ-613 00 Brno, Czech Republic 2 Department of Animal Nutrition and Forage Production Faculty of Agronomy, Mendel University of Agriculture and Forestry, Zemedelska 1, CZ-613 00 Brno, Czech Republic 3 Department of Veterinary Ecology and Environmental Protection, Faculty of Veterinary Hygiene and Ecology, University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Palackeho 1-3, CZ-612 42 Brno, Czech Republic 4 Department of Microelectronics, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Communication, Brno University of Technology, Udolni 53, CZ-602 00 Brno, Czech Republic 5 Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 37, CZ-611 37 Brno, Czech Republic
* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 1 October 2007 / Accepted: 17 October 2007 / Published: 19 October 2007
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Abstract

Metallothioneins play a key role in maintaining homeostasis of essential metalsand in protecting of cells against metal toxicity as well as oxidative damaging. Exceptinghumans, blood levels of metallothionein have not yet been reported from any animalspecies. Blood plasma samples of 9 animal species were analysed by the adsorptive transferstripping technique to obtain species specific voltammograms. Quite distinct records wereobtained from the Takin (Budorcas taxicolor), while other interesting records were observedin samples from the European Bison (Bison bonasus bonasus) and the Red-eared Slider(Trachemys scripta elegans). To quantify metallothionein the catalytic peak Cat2 was used,well developed in the Domestic Fowl (Gallus gallus f. domestica) and showing a very lowsignal in the Red Deer (Cervus elaphus). The highest levels of metallothionein reachingover 20 μM were found in the Domestic Fowl. High levels of MT were also found in theBearded Dragon (Pogona vitticeps) and the Grey Wolf (Canis lupus lupus). The lowestvalues of about 1-3 μM were determined in the Red-eared Slider, Takin and Red Deer. Employing a simple electrochemical detection it was possible to examine variation in blood metallothionein in different species of vertebrates.
Keywords: Electrochemical detection; Catalytic signal; Brdicka reaction; Heavy metals; Red-eared Slider; Bearded Dragon; Domestic Fowl; Grey Wolf; Bactrian Camel; Reindeer; Takin; European Bison; Red Deer Electrochemical detection; Catalytic signal; Brdicka reaction; Heavy metals; Red-eared Slider; Bearded Dragon; Domestic Fowl; Grey Wolf; Bactrian Camel; Reindeer; Takin; European Bison; Red Deer
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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Adam, V.; Beklova, M.; Pikula, J.; Hubalek, J.; Trnkova, L.; Kizek, R. Shapes of Differential Pulse Voltammograms and Level of Metallothionein at Different Animal Species. Sensors 2007, 7, 2419-2429.

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