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Molecules 2016, 21(4), 403; doi:10.3390/molecules21040403

Effect of Drying Methods on the Steroidal Alkaloid Content of Potato Peels, Shoots and Berries

1
Department of Food Biosciences, Teagasc Food Research Centre, Ashtown, D15 DY05 Dublin, Ireland
2
School of Agriculture and Food Science, University College Dublin, D04 V1W8 Dublin, Ireland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Derek J. McPhee
Received: 13 January 2016 / Revised: 9 March 2016 / Accepted: 11 March 2016 / Published: 25 March 2016
(This article belongs to the Section Natural Products)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1050 KB, uploaded 25 March 2016]   |  

Abstract

The present study has found that dried potato samples yielded significantly higher levels of steroidal alkaloids such as α-solanine and α-chaconine than the corresponding fresh samples, as determined by the UPLC-MS/MS technique. Among the drying techniques used, air drying had the highest effect on steroidal alkaloid contents, followed by freeze drying and vacuum oven drying. There was no significant difference between the freeze dried and vacuum oven dried samples in their α-chaconine contents. However, freeze dried potato shoots and berries had significantly higher α-solanine contents (825 µg/g dry weight (DW) in shoots and 2453 µg/g DW in berries) than the vacuum oven dried ones (325 µg/g dry weight (DW) in shoots and 2080 µg/g DW in berries). The kinetics of steroidal alkaloid contents of potato shoots during air drying were monitored over a period of 21 days. Both α-solanine and α-chaconine content increased to their maximum values, 875 µg/g DW and 3385 µg/g DW, respectively, after 7 days of drying. The steroidal alkaloid contents of the shoots decreased significantly at day 9, and then remained unchanged until day 21. In line with the potato shoots, air dried potato tuber peels also had higher steroidal alkaloid content than the freeze dried and vacuum oven dried samples. However, a significant decrease of steroidal alkaloid content was observed in air dried potato berries, possibly due to degradation during slicing of the whole berries prior to air drying. Remarkable variation in steroidal alkaloid contents among different tissue types of potato plants was observed with the potato flowers having the highest content. View Full-Text
Keywords: potato; α-solanine; α-chaconine; drying; abiotic stress; UPLC-MS/MS potato; α-solanine; α-chaconine; drying; abiotic stress; UPLC-MS/MS
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hossain, M.B.; Brunton, N.P.; Rai, D.K. Effect of Drying Methods on the Steroidal Alkaloid Content of Potato Peels, Shoots and Berries. Molecules 2016, 21, 403.

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