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Molecules 2012, 17(6), 6953-6981; doi:10.3390/molecules17066953
Review

Eugenol—From the Remote Maluku Islands to the International Market Place: A Review of a Remarkable and Versatile Molecule

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 and *
Received: 4 May 2012; in revised form: 18 May 2012 / Accepted: 30 May 2012 / Published: 6 June 2012
(This article belongs to the collection Bioactive Compounds)
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Abstract: Eugenol is a major volatile constituent of clove essential oil obtained through hydrodistillation of mainly Eugenia caryophyllata (=Syzygium aromaticum) buds and leaves. It is a remarkably versatile molecule incorporated as a functional ingredient in numerous products and has found application in the pharmaceutical, agricultural, fragrance, flavour, cosmetic and various other industries. Its vast range of pharmacological activities has been well-researched and includes antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anti-oxidant and anticancer activities, amongst others. In addition, it is widely used in agricultural applications to protect foods from micro-organisms during storage, which might have an effect on human health, and as a pesticide and fumigant. As a functional ingredient, it is included in many dental preparations and it has also been shown to enhance skin permeation of various drugs. Eugenol is considered safe as a food additive but due to the wide range of different applications, extensive use and availability of clove oil, it is pertinent to discuss the general toxicity with special reference to contact dermatitis. This review summarises the pharmacological, agricultural and other applications of eugenol with specific emphasis on mechanism of action as well as toxicity data.
Keywords: clove oil; Eugenia caryophyllata; eugenol; mechanism of action; pharmacological activity; Syzygium aromaticum; toxicity clove oil; Eugenia caryophyllata; eugenol; mechanism of action; pharmacological activity; Syzygium aromaticum; toxicity
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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MDPI and ACS Style

Kamatou, G.P.; Vermaak, I.; Viljoen, A.M. Eugenol—From the Remote Maluku Islands to the International Market Place: A Review of a Remarkable and Versatile Molecule. Molecules 2012, 17, 6953-6981.

AMA Style

Kamatou GP, Vermaak I, Viljoen AM. Eugenol—From the Remote Maluku Islands to the International Market Place: A Review of a Remarkable and Versatile Molecule. Molecules. 2012; 17(6):6953-6981.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kamatou, Guy P.; Vermaak, Ilze; Viljoen, Alvaro M. 2012. "Eugenol—From the Remote Maluku Islands to the International Market Place: A Review of a Remarkable and Versatile Molecule." Molecules 17, no. 6: 6953-6981.


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