Special Issue "Current Research Findings in Veterinary Medicine in the Caribbean Region"

A special issue of Veterinary Sciences (ISSN 2306-7381).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 October 2017)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Lennox Applewhaite

Office of the President, Wildlife Management Authority (WMA), Ganges St., Sophia, Georgetown Guyana And Veterinary Officer, Wildlife Division, WMA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: bovine; Babesia; IFA; haemoparasites; zoonoses
Guest Editor
Dr. Carla Phillips

Faculty of Medical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine Eric Williams Medical Sciences Complex The University of the West Indies, St. Augustine Campus Champs Fleurs, Trinidad and Tobago W.I.
Website | E-Mail
Interests: One Health; aquatic medicine (marine mammals, sea turtles, fish health and management)
Guest Editor
Dr. Brendan Lee

School of Veterinary Medicine Saint Matthew’s University Lime Tree Bay Ave West Bay, Cayman Islands
Website | E-Mail
Interests: food safety; food defense; food security; food supply chains; zoonoses; vector-borne disease; public health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

On 14–17 November, 2016, the 29th Conference of the Caribbean Veterinary Medical Association was held in Georgetown, Guyana. During this meeting, veterinary researchers presented and discussed the newest findings in veterinary sciences in the region, covering subject areas ranging from clinical medicine and surgery to infectious diseases. A specific focus of this conference was “One Health in the Caribbean and the wider world’ and its implementation in the region will be highlighted along with research findings in different fields within the Caribbean. Presenters and attendees of this conference, as well as other researchers in the region, are offered the opportunity to publish their most recent research findings in the field of Veterinary Research, along with reviews and case reports. Authors are cordially invited to submit papers to the upcoming Special Issue edition of Veterinary Sciences (ISSN 2306-7381). The manuscript/paper can be submitted via email to the Guest Editors.

Dr. Lennox Applewhaite
Dr. Carla Phillips
Dr. Brendan Lee
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Veterinary Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Caribbean,
  • One Health,
  • Veterinary Medicine

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessCommunication Detection of Antibodies to Seven Priority Pathogens in Backyard Poultry in Trinidad, West Indies
Vet. Sci. 2018, 5(1), 11; doi:10.3390/vetsci5010011 (registering DOI)
Received: 15 December 2017 / Revised: 12 January 2018 / Accepted: 17 January 2018 / Published: 20 January 2018
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Abstract
Backyard poultry farms in Trinidad and Tobago (T&T) play a vital role in providing food and income for rural communities. There is currently no information on the presence and circulation of pathogens in backyard poultry farms in T&T, and little is known in
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Backyard poultry farms in Trinidad and Tobago (T&T) play a vital role in providing food and income for rural communities. There is currently no information on the presence and circulation of pathogens in backyard poultry farms in T&T, and little is known in relation to the potential risks of spread of these pathogens to the commercial poultry sector. In order to address this, serum samples were collected from 41 chickens on five backyard farms taken from selected locations in Trinidad. Samples were tested for antibodies to seven priority pathogens of poultry by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Antibodies were detected in 65% (CI 95%: 50–78%) of the sampled birds for Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), 67.5% (CI 95%: 52–80%) for Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), 10% (CI 95%: 4–23%) for Newcastle disease virus (NDV), 0% (CI 95%: 0–0%) for Avian influenza virus (AIV), 0% (CI 95%: 0–0%) for West Nile virus (WNV), 31.7% (CI 95%: 20–47%) for Mycoplasm gallisepticum/synoviae and 0% (CI 95%: 0–0%) for Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis. These results reveal the presence and circulation of important pathogens of poultry in selected backyard farms in Trinidad. The results provide important information which should be taken into consideration when assessing the risks of pathogen transmission between commercial and backyard poultry farms, as well as between poultry and wild birds. Full article
Open AccessArticle A Limited Survey of Aflatoxins in Poultry Feed and Feed Ingredients in Guyana
Vet. Sci. 2017, 4(4), 60; doi:10.3390/vetsci4040060
Received: 28 October 2017 / Revised: 21 November 2017 / Accepted: 22 November 2017 / Published: 24 November 2017
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Abstract
A study was conducted to determine the presence of aflatoxins in finished poultry feed from manufacturing companies, feed ingredients, and poultry feed at the point of sale. Two collections were made. In the first collection, samples of the finished feed and feed ingredients
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A study was conducted to determine the presence of aflatoxins in finished poultry feed from manufacturing companies, feed ingredients, and poultry feed at the point of sale. Two collections were made. In the first collection, samples of the finished feed and feed ingredients were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). For the second collection, all samples were analyzed by ELISA while a subset was analyzed by HPLC. Of the 27 samples of finished feed, five samples had aflatoxin concentrations greater than the United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) and European Union Commission (EUC) maximum tolerable limit of 20 µg/kg, while for the feed ingredients, three of the 30 samples of feed ingredients exceeded the limit. Of the 93 samples of finished feed purchased from retailers, five samples had aflatoxin concentrations greater than the maximum tolerable limit. This survey indicates that most of the samples were below the maximum regulatory limit and maintained quality up to the point of sale for 2015 and 2016. However, given that some samples were above the limit, there is a need to monitor the production and marketing chain to ensure that the quality of the finished feed is not compromised. Full article

Other

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Open AccessCase Report A Multicentric T-Cell Lymphoma with a Plasmacytoid Morphology in a Dog
Vet. Sci. 2018, 5(1), 10; doi:10.3390/vetsci5010010 (registering DOI)
Received: 2 November 2017 / Revised: 15 January 2018 / Accepted: 18 January 2018 / Published: 20 January 2018
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Abstract
An 8-year-old male (neutered) Labrador with a history of erythematous skin lesions and exercise intolerance for a prolonged period was suddenly found dead. Necropsy findings revealed an infiltrative, focally extensive mass which occupied 25% of the cardiac interventricular septum. Severe endocardiosis was also
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An 8-year-old male (neutered) Labrador with a history of erythematous skin lesions and exercise intolerance for a prolonged period was suddenly found dead. Necropsy findings revealed an infiltrative, focally extensive mass which occupied 25% of the cardiac interventricular septum. Severe endocardiosis was also found on the bicuspid and tricuspid valves. The submandibular lymph nodes and kidneys were bilaterally enlarged, and the pre-hepatic lymph node and spleen were also enlarged. Multiple dermal pustules were present around the mouth and on the ear, and small ulcers were present on the tongue. Histopathological examination detected the presence of neoplastic lymphocytes with a plasmacytoid morphology in these tissues as well as in the tongue and skin lesions. Immunohistochemical (CD3+/CD18+) evaluation was consistent with a T-cell lymphoma, which could be classified as a peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified (PTCL-NOS). Full article
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Open AccessCase Report A Case Report of Disseminated Canine Histiocytic Sarcoma in Trinidad and Tobago
Vet. Sci. 2018, 5(1), 9; doi:10.3390/vetsci5010009 (registering DOI)
Received: 7 November 2017 / Revised: 13 December 2017 / Accepted: 12 January 2018 / Published: 19 January 2018
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Abstract
Ocular histiocytic sarcomas (as a presenting part of disseminated histiocytic sarcoma) are not commonly diagnosed. A 10-year-old female intact Rottweiler presented to the School of Veterinary Medicine, Trinidad with buphthalmia and pain in the left eye. The cornea of the left eye appeared
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Ocular histiocytic sarcomas (as a presenting part of disseminated histiocytic sarcoma) are not commonly diagnosed. A 10-year-old female intact Rottweiler presented to the School of Veterinary Medicine, Trinidad with buphthalmia and pain in the left eye. The cornea of the left eye appeared diffusely opaque with a conjunctival mucopurulent ocular discharge. A thorough ophthalmic assessment identified an intraocular proliferative tumor to which a unilateral enucleation was performed, however the animal died soon after. Post mortem examination and light microscopy revealed that the intraocular lesion with visceral macro-metastases was in fact a histiocytic sarcoma. Further to this, immune-phenotyping was performed to confirm the diagnosis of disseminated histiocytic sarcoma. This is the first time such a tumor has been diagnosed in Trinidad and Tobago. Full article
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Open AccessCase Report Oral Plasmacytoma in a Dog
Vet. Sci. 2017, 4(4), 68; doi:10.3390/vetsci4040068
Received: 18 October 2017 / Revised: 21 November 2017 / Accepted: 6 December 2017 / Published: 14 December 2017
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Abstract
A 6-year-old male Pit bull mix dog presented for bleeding from the mouth persisting for five days. A clinical evaluation revealed a 2 × 3 cm soft tissue mandibular mass at the crown of the first premolar, as well as a non-regenerative anemia
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A 6-year-old male Pit bull mix dog presented for bleeding from the mouth persisting for five days. A clinical evaluation revealed a 2 × 3 cm soft tissue mandibular mass at the crown of the first premolar, as well as a non-regenerative anemia and hyperproteinemia. Cytologic and histopathologic evaluations of the mass were compatible with an oral plasmacytoma. Full article
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