Special Issue "Understanding Population, Development, and Environment Linkages in the Context of Global Climate Change"

A special issue of Social Sciences (ISSN 2076-0760).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 October 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Professor Sara R. Curran

University of Washington Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies & Department of Sociology, 417 Thompson Hall, Box 353650, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: social demography; environment; development and globalization; gender

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ever since Ehrlich and Holdren proposed the IPAT model in the early 1970s, social scientists have sought to provide elaborations and evaluate the evidence against their model. However, the onset of global climate change research has overtaken much of the nuanced understandings associated with earlier empirical and theoretical work about population, development, and environment linkages. In this Special Issue, we seek to publish papers that reinvigorate this earlier line of inquiry with data and theories that can do so in the context of also understanding the current and future impact of global climate change. Innovative methodologies and a greater array of data sources at multiple levels of analysis should facilitate the observation and evaluation of linkages across these three domains. This Special Issue welcomes research papers at any scale, from global to local, but these should explicitly observe factors in each domain and the mechanisms linking across domains. Papers should conform to basic social science research expectations and include a theoretical framework and systematic evaluation of evidence.

Prof. Dr. Sara R. Curran
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Social Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • Population
  • Migration
  • Fertility
  • Mortality
  • Population Health
  • Economies
  • Social Welfare
  • Inequality
  • Environment
  • Environmental Resilience
  • Environmental Degradation
  • Linkage Methodologies
  • Dynamic Models
  • Environmental Endowments
  • Environmental Amenities and Services
  • Coupled Human and Natural Systems
  • Livelihoods
  • Climate Change

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Applying ExpandNet’s Systematic Approach to Scaling Up in an Integrated Population, Health and Environment Project in East Africa
Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(1), 8; doi:10.3390/socsci7010008
Received: 5 October 2017 / Revised: 25 November 2017 / Accepted: 17 December 2017 / Published: 2 January 2018
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Abstract
While the importance of pursuing integrated population, health and environment (PHE) approaches and ensuring their sustainable expansion to regional and national levels have been widely affirmed in the development field, little practical experience and evidence exist about how this can be accomplished. This
[...] Read more.
While the importance of pursuing integrated population, health and environment (PHE) approaches and ensuring their sustainable expansion to regional and national levels have been widely affirmed in the development field, little practical experience and evidence exist about how this can be accomplished. This paper lays out the systematic approach to scale up developed by ExpandNet and subsequently illustrates its application in the Health of People and Environment in the Lake Victoria Basin (HoPE-LVB) project, which is an integrated PHE project implemented in Uganda and Kenya from 2012–2017. Results demonstrate not only the perceived relevance of pursuing integrated development approaches by stakeholders but also the fundamental value of systematically designing and implementing the project with focused attention to scale up, as well as the challenges involved in operationalizing commitment to integration among bureaucratic agencies deeply grounded in vertical departmental approaches. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Diffusion of Electricity Consumption Practices in Mexico
Soc. Sci. 2017, 6(4), 144; doi:10.3390/socsci6040144
Received: 1 October 2017 / Revised: 13 November 2017 / Accepted: 21 November 2017 / Published: 24 November 2017
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Abstract
In recent decades, residential energy consumption has grown in Mexico despite high poverty levels. While inequalities in energy have been documented, less attention has been paid to practices of consumption. Particularly, we sustain that it is necessary to account for changes in associated
[...] Read more.
In recent decades, residential energy consumption has grown in Mexico despite high poverty levels. While inequalities in energy have been documented, less attention has been paid to practices of consumption. Particularly, we sustain that it is necessary to account for changes in associated behaviors, which shape energy use, such as the acquisition of electrical appliances. This paper analyzes if there is evidence of diffusion of energy practices from higher to lower-income households. We hypothesize that more intensive energy practices expand across groups beyond their demographic and socioeconomic characteristics. Employing a harmonized dataset of thirteen Income and Expenditure Household Surveys, we assess changes in electrical appliances and electricity consumption. Using latent class analysis, we construct energy profiles that identify underlying consumption behaviors from sociodemographic and residential characteristics. We find support for the argument that intensive energy practices expanded from high to lower socioeconomic groups. While this trend reflects improvements in living conditions in Mexico, it also highlights the environmental challenges that increasing consumption poses for sustainable development goals. Full article
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