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Special Issue "Monitoring of Odorous Compounds in the Environment"

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A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2008)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Ki-Hyun Kim

Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Hanyang University, 222 Wangsimni-Ro, Seoul 133-791, Korea
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +82 2 2220 1945
Interests: environmental monitoring; volatile organic compounds; reduced sulfur compounds; carbonyls

Special Issue Information

All types of sensors applicable to the determination of odorous compounds in various environmental matrices (e.g., air, water, and soil) will be covered in this special issue. In recent years, the assessment of odor pollution is generally made either by indirect means such as quantitative analysis based on instrumental detection or by the use of direct (sensory or olfactory) methods. As a primary means to control odor pollution from various emission sources, quantitative analysis of the offensive odorous compounds is considered as the primary task. Many advances have in fact been achieved in the instrumental detection of odorous compounds with the employment of delicate analytical systems. However, sensor techniques yet suffer significantly from low sensitivity or interference problems. More efforts are hence desirable to improve our application of sensor techniques to the detection and accurate quantification of odorous compounds under the various environmental settings.

Keywords

  • environmental monitoring
  • air
  • water
  • soil
  • malodor
  • nuisance
  • olfactory sensing

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Olfaction-based Detection Distance: A Quantitative Analysis of How Far Away Dogs Recognize Tortoise Odor and Follow It to Source
Sensors 2008, 8(4), 2208-2222; doi:10.3390/s8042208
Received: 14 January 2008 / Accepted: 27 March 2008 / Published: 28 March 2008
Cited by 29 | PDF Full-text (606 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The use of detector dogs has been demonstrated to be effective and safe for finding Mojave desert tortoises and provides certain advantages over humans in field surveys. Unlike humans who rely on visual cues for target identification, dogs use primarily olfactory cues and
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The use of detector dogs has been demonstrated to be effective and safe for finding Mojave desert tortoises and provides certain advantages over humans in field surveys. Unlike humans who rely on visual cues for target identification, dogs use primarily olfactory cues and can therefore locate targets that are not visually obvious. One of the key benefits of surveying with dogs is their efficiency at covering ground and their ability to detect targets from long distances. Dogs may investigate potential targets using visual cues but confirm the presence of a target based on scent. Everything that emits odor does so via vapor-phase molecules and the components comprising a particular scent are carried primarily though bulk movement of the atmosphere. It is the ability to search for target odor and then go to its source that makes dogs ideal for rapid target recognition in the field setting. Using tortoises as targets, we quantified distances that dogs detected tortoise scent, followed it to source, and correctly identified tortoises as targets. Detection distance data were collected during experimental trials with advanced global positioning system (GPS) technology and then analyzed using geographic information system (GIS) modeling techniques. Detection distances ranged from 0.5 m to 62.8 m for tortoises on the surface. We did not observe bias with tortoise size, age class, sex or the degree to which tortoises were handled prior to being found by the dogs. The methodology we developed to quantify olfaction-based detection distance using dogs can be applied to other targets that dogs are trained to find. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Monitoring of Odorous Compounds in the Environment)

Review

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Open AccessReview First Contact to Odors: Our Current Knowledge about Odorant Receptor
Sensors 2008, 8(10), 6303-6320; doi:10.3390/s8106303
Received: 11 September 2008 / Revised: 7 October 2008 / Accepted: 8 October 2008 / Published: 9 October 2008
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (522 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Chemical senses – especially smell – are known to be important for the fundamental life events such as sensing predators, selecting mates, as well as finding food. The chemical senses are decoded in the olfactory system which is able to detect and differentiate
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Chemical senses – especially smell – are known to be important for the fundamental life events such as sensing predators, selecting mates, as well as finding food. The chemical senses are decoded in the olfactory system which is able to detect and differentiate thousands of odorous substances comprised of chemically divergent structures (i.e. odorants). The high selectivity of the olfactory system is heavily dependent on the receptors for each odorants (i.e. odorant receptors). Thus, studying odorant receptors may not only facilitate our understanding the initial events of olfaction but provide crucial knowledge for developing a novel, odorant receptor-based biosensor for chemical screening. Here we provide a review of recent advances in our understanding of odorant receptors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Monitoring of Odorous Compounds in the Environment)
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