Special Issue "Land Surface Fluxes"

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A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2009)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Assefa M. Melesse
Department of Earth and Environment, AHC-5-390, Florida International University, 11200 SW 8th Street, Miami, FL 33199, USA
Website: http://faculty.fiu.edu/~melessea/
E-Mail: melessea@fiu.edu
Phone: (305) 348-6518
Fax: (305) 348-6137
Interests: spatial energy flux; land-cover scaling; spatially distributed modeling; neural networks application; hydrological modeling; ecohydrology

Guest Editor
Dr. Gabriel Senay
1 Research Physical Scientist: USGS, Center for Earth Resource Observation & Science (EROS), Mundt Federal Building, 47914 252nd Street, Sioux Falls, SD 57198-0001, USA
2 South Dakota State University, GISc Center of Excellence (GIScCE), USA
E-Mail: senay@usgs.gov
Phone: +1 605 594 2758
Interests: regional water balance assessment and monitoring

Guest Editor
Dr. Mekonnen Gebremichael
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Connecticut, 261 Glenbrook Rd., UNIT-2037, Storrs, CT 06269-2037, USA
Website: http://www.engr.uconn.edu/cee/people/facultymembers/15-research/49-mekonnen.html
E-Mail: mekonnen@engr.uconn.edu
Phone: +1 860 486 2771
Fax: +1 860 486 2298
Interests: distributed watershed hydrologic modeling; water-energy-carbon fluxes coupling; land-atmosphere interaction; remote sensing applications in hydrology; hydrometeorology; hydroclimatology and ecohydrology; stochastic methods (spatial and temporal analyses); uncertainty analysis; non-linear dynamics (scaling issues)

Special Issue Information

Energy, water, carbon, and nitrogen (E-W-C-N) fluxes are all critical for humans and ecosystems and have strong links to climate. These fluxes have been perturbed by human activity throughout human history. However, these influences have accelerated in the past five decades or so, causing marked changes in regional and global climate. E-W-C-N fluxes show notable relationships and feedbacks. To quantify these fluxes at a larger spatial scale and establish the link among fluxes and their linkages to climate and hydrological dynamics, remote sensing approaches will be essential and practical.The Special Issue of Remote Sensing journal will publish those full research and high rated manuscripts addressing E-W-C-N fluxes using remote sensing data assimilation and modeling approaches. Flux and surface parameter estimation; evapotranspiration modeling and validation; carbon, methane and nitrogen fluxes from different ecosystems and in relation to field or watershed management options; remote sensing data assimilation and integration to landscape models; fluxes and climate dynamics; spatial and temporal dynamics of fluxes using new machine learning techniques (ANN, neurofuzzy, and others) will be accepted. --> Energy, water, carbon, and nitrogen (E-W-C-N) fluxes are all critical for humans and ecosystems and have strong links to climate. These fluxes have been perturbed by human activity throughout human history. However, these influences have accelerated in the past five decades or so, causing marked changes in regional and global climate. E-W-C-N fluxes show notable relationships and feedbacks. To quantify these fluxes at a larger spatial scale and establish the link among fluxes and their linkages to climate and hydrological dynamics, remote sensing approaches will be essential and practical.The Special Issue of Remote Sensing journal will publish those full research and high rated manuscripts addressing E-W-C-N fluxes using remote sensing data assimilation and modeling approaches. Flux and surface parameter estimation; evapotranspiration modeling and validation; carbon, methane and nitrogen fluxes from different ecosystems and in relation to field or watershed management options; remote sensing data assimilation and integration to landscape models; fluxes and climate dynamics; spatial and temporal dynamics of fluxes using new machine learning techniques (ANN, neurofuzzy, and others) will be accepted.

Keywords

  • water
  • carbonnitrogen and energy fluxes
  • soil moisture
  • albedo
  • emssivity
  • surface temperature
  • wetlands
  • latent heat flux
  • sensible heat flux

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Displaying article 1-2
p. 795-817
by , ,  and
Remote Sens. 2009, 1(4), 795-817; doi:10.3390/rs1040795
Received: 31 August 2009; in revised form: 11 October 2009 / Accepted: 19 October 2009 / Published: 27 October 2009
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (866 KB)
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land Surface Fluxes)
p. 159-183
by  and
Remote Sens. 2009, 1(3), 159-183; doi:10.3390/rs1030159
Received: 1 June 2009; in revised form: 7 June 2009 / Accepted: 30 June 2009 / Published: 6 July 2009
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (331 KB)
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land Surface Fluxes)
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Last update: 4 March 2014

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