Topical Collection "Facilities"

Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Klaus-Dieter Liss

Guangdong Technion - Israel Institute of Technology (GTIIT), 241 Daxue Lu, Jinping Qu, Shantou, Guangdong Province, China
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +86 136 7612 7052
Interests: in-situ, time-resolved scattering; structural and functional materials; metals; semiconductors; thermo-mechanical processing; phase transformations; ferroics; kinetics and dynamics; extreme conditions; texture analysis; plasticity; materials development; metallic glass; light metals; TiAl intermetallics; steels; diffraction optics; interferometry; ultra-short time scales; synchrotrons; neutrons; free-electron lasers

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Topical Collection, Facilities, aims to assemble review and original articles to describe existing, upcoming, planned and historic large-user facilities for materials and life sciences around the world. Quantum beams encompass all kind of short-wavelength radiation for the study of condensed mater materials in the widest sense. In particular, this includes synchrotron and neutron radiation, ion beams, positrons, muons and to some extent lasers, where they interact under extreme conditions or are correlated with some other kind of quantum beam. While most of those quantum beams can be generated on a small laboratory scale, state-of-the-art sources are assembled in large-scale multi-user facilities.

The widest spread of facilities in this context are synchrotron radiation facilities, where high-energy electrons circulate in a storage ring to produce light of any wavelength to independently operating beamlines. The number of simultaneous beamlines and experiments can be as high as 50 and photon energies spread from infrared to gamma rays.

Complementary neutron facilities can be based around a nuclear reactor or in the form of a proton accelerator driven spallation source. They, equally, have multiple beam sources delivering to a multitude of most different instruments, such as for imaging, spectroscopy or diffraction. The same holds for positron and muon sources.

Large power laser sources can either produce materials under extreme conditions, or interact with another beam, such as accelerator electrons for inverse Compton scattering—delivering gamma rays within a large user facility. Furthermore, laser facilities may be important for pump-probe experiments in condensed and ionized matter.

Proton and ions beams represent another class, which may be accelerator based and then form a facility. Their applications are broad.

In order to lay the basis for later topics and the applications, the journal Quantum Beam Science calls for descriptions of the sources of such radiation, with the goal of creating a collection of papers that will serve as reference standards for users. It will be an excellent channel for exposure and comparison for each facility, and aims to be comprehensive.

In particular, we seek papers of facilities encompassing more than one single beamline. (A Beamlines collection may follow if there is sufficient demand.) The articles should describe the facility's background and context, its overall layout, the radiation production process, the key parameters in a scientific and engineering manner, an overview of beamlines, and outline some typical applications. Descriptions of the key parts can be done in depth, including information on the detailed layout, neutron-moderator concepts, or synchrotron insertion devices. Individual, modern and upcoming facilities should be featured in articles, while reviews should focus on types of facilities or historic facilities. Well founded ideas and concepts of future facilities are welcome. Reviews are sought on classes of quantum beam sources, such as an overview and the characteristics of all kinds of X-ray tubes, or small ion or neutron sources.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • synchrotron radiation facilities
  • neutron facilities
  • free-electron lasers
  • energy-recovery-linac based radiation
  • muon facilities
  • positrons
  • heavy and light ion beams
  • extreme laser facilities
  • history of facilities
  • reviews of classes of conventional sources
  • review of a kind of radiation

Welcome to the journal Quantum Beam Science!

Yours, sincerely,

Prof.Dr. Klaus-Dieter Liss
Editor-in-Chief

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Quantum Beam Science is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • synchrotron
  • neutrons
  • free-electron laser
  • energy-recovery-linac
  • muons; positrons
  • heavy and light ion beams
  • extreme laser

Published Papers (9 papers)

2017

Open AccessReview Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF) at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex II: Neutron Scattering Instruments
Quantum Beam Sci. 2017, 1(3), 9; doi:10.3390/qubs1030009
Received: 28 June 2017 / Revised: 25 October 2017 / Accepted: 7 November 2017 / Published: 17 November 2017
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Abstract
The neutron instruments suite, installed at the spallation neutron source of the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF) at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), is reviewed. MLF has 23 neutron beam ports and 21 instruments are in operation for user
[...] Read more.
The neutron instruments suite, installed at the spallation neutron source of the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF) at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), is reviewed. MLF has 23 neutron beam ports and 21 instruments are in operation for user programs or are under commissioning. A unique and challenging instrumental suite in MLF has been realized via combination of a high-performance neutron source, optimized for neutron scattering, and unique instruments using cutting-edge technologies. All instruments are/will serve in world-leading investigations in a broad range of fields, from fundamental physics to industrial applications. In this review, overviews, characteristic features, and typical applications of the individual instruments are mentioned. Full article
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Open AccessReview Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex III: Neutron Devices and Computational and Sample Environments
Quantum Beam Sci. 2017, 1(2), 10; doi:10.3390/qubs1020010
Received: 12 May 2017 / Revised: 21 July 2017 / Accepted: 24 July 2017 / Published: 3 August 2017
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Abstract
Neutron devices such as neutron detectors, optical devices including supermirror devices and 3He neutron spin filters, and choppers are successfully developed and installed at the Materials Life Science Facility (MLF) of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), Tokai, Japan. Four software
[...] Read more.
Neutron devices such as neutron detectors, optical devices including supermirror devices and 3He neutron spin filters, and choppers are successfully developed and installed at the Materials Life Science Facility (MLF) of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), Tokai, Japan. Four software components of MLF computational environment, instrument control, data acquisition, data analysis, and a database, have been developed and equipped at MLF. MLF also provides a wide variety of sample environment options including high and low temperatures, high magnetic fields, and high pressures. This paper describes the current status of neutron devices, computational and sample environments at MLF. Full article
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Open AccessReview Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex I: Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source
Quantum Beam Sci. 2017, 1(2), 8; doi:10.3390/qubs1020008
Received: 9 May 2017 / Revised: 12 July 2017 / Accepted: 20 July 2017 / Published: 2 August 2017
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Abstract
At the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), a pulsed spallation neutron source provides neutrons with high intensity and narrow pulse width pulse to promote researches on a variety of science in the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF). It was designed
[...] Read more.
At the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), a pulsed spallation neutron source provides neutrons with high intensity and narrow pulse width pulse to promote researches on a variety of science in the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF). It was designed to be driven by a proton beam with an energy of 3 GeV, a power of 1 MW at a repetition rate of 25 Hz, that is world’s highest power level. It is still on the way towards the goal to accomplish the operation with a 1 MW proton beam. In this review, distinctive features of the target-moderator-reflector system of the pulsed spallation neutron source are presented. Full article
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Open AccessReview Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex IV: The Muon Facility
Quantum Beam Sci. 2017, 1(1), 11; doi:10.3390/qubs1010011
Received: 1 May 2017 / Revised: 31 May 2017 / Accepted: 8 June 2017 / Published: 15 June 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (16274 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A muon experimental facility, known as the Muon Science Establishment (MUSE), is one of the user facilities at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex, along with those for neutrons, hadrons, and neutrinos. The MUSE facility is integrated into the Materials and Life Science
[...] Read more.
A muon experimental facility, known as the Muon Science Establishment (MUSE), is one of the user facilities at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex, along with those for neutrons, hadrons, and neutrinos. The MUSE facility is integrated into the Materials and Life Science Facility building in which a high-energy proton beam that is shared with a neutron experiment facility delivers a variety of muon beams for research covering diverse scientific fields. In this review, we present the current status of MUSE, which is still in the process of being developed into its fully fledged form. Full article
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Open AccessReview High Power Laser Facilities at the Kansai Photon Science Institute
Quantum Beam Sci. 2017, 1(1), 7; doi:10.3390/qubs1010007
Received: 27 March 2017 / Revised: 26 May 2017 / Accepted: 30 May 2017 / Published: 7 June 2017
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Abstract
At the Kansai Photon Science Institute (KPSI, Kyoto, Japan), there are three unique high-power laser facilities. Here, we introduce the features of each facility and some experimental studies, which will be useful to users as a reference. Full article
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Open AccessReview Neutron Sources at the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research
Quantum Beam Sci. 2017, 1(1), 6; doi:10.3390/qubs1010006
Received: 11 January 2017 / Revised: 23 March 2017 / Accepted: 28 March 2017 / Published: 21 April 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1759 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The IBR-2 reactor and IREN facility are the two main neutron sources at the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics. This contribution presents data on the IBR-2 reactor parameters before and after modernization. The general schemes of the IBR-2 reactor as well as of
[...] Read more.
The IBR-2 reactor and IREN facility are the two main neutron sources at the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics. This contribution presents data on the IBR-2 reactor parameters before and after modernization. The general schemes of the IBR-2 reactor as well as of the IREN facility are presented. Full article
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Open AccessReview Neutron Scattering at HIFAR—Glimpses of the Past
Quantum Beam Sci. 2017, 1(1), 5; doi:10.3390/qubs1010005
Received: 23 February 2017 / Revised: 20 March 2017 / Accepted: 28 March 2017 / Published: 19 April 2017
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Abstract
This article attempts to give a description of neutron scattering down under for close on forty-six years. The early years describe the fledgling group buying parts and cobbling instruments together to its emergence as a viable neutron scattering group with up to ten
[...] Read more.
This article attempts to give a description of neutron scattering down under for close on forty-six years. The early years describe the fledgling group buying parts and cobbling instruments together to its emergence as a viable neutron scattering group with up to ten working instruments. The second section covers the consolidation of this group, despite tough higher level management. The Australian Science and Technology Council (ASTEC) enquiry in 1985 and the Government decision not to replace the HIgh Flux Australian Reactor (HIFAR), led to major expansion and upgrading of the existing neutron beam facilities during the 1990s. Finally, there were some smooth years of operation while other staff were preparing for the replacement reactor. It has concentrated on the instruments as they were built, modified, replaced with new ones, and upgraded at different times. Full article
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Open AccessArticle The Brightest Light in Canada: The Canadian Light Source
Quantum Beam Sci. 2017, 1(1), 4; doi:10.3390/qubs1010004
Received: 10 December 2016 / Revised: 23 March 2017 / Accepted: 24 March 2017 / Published: 31 March 2017
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Abstract
Over forty years in the making, and one of Canada’s largest scientific investments in those four decades, the Canadian Light Source (CLS), a third generation source of synchrotron light, was designed for high performance and flexibility and serves the diverse needs of the
[...] Read more.
Over forty years in the making, and one of Canada’s largest scientific investments in those four decades, the Canadian Light Source (CLS), a third generation source of synchrotron light, was designed for high performance and flexibility and serves the diverse needs of the Canadian research community by providing brilliant light for applied and basic research programmes ranging from the far infrared to the hard X-ray regimes. Development of the scientific program at the CLS has been envisioned in four distinct phases. The first phase consists of the accelerator complex together with seven experimental facilities; the second phase adds six more experimental facilities and additional infrastructure to support them; the third phase adds seven more experimental facilities; and the fourth phase focuses on beamline and endstation upgrades, keeping the CLS as a state-of-the-art research centre. With the growth of a strong user community, the success of these experimental facilities will drive the future growth of the CLS. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Irradiation Facilities of the Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute
Quantum Beam Sci. 2017, 1(1), 2; doi:10.3390/qubs1010002
Received: 11 January 2017 / Revised: 27 February 2017 / Accepted: 13 March 2017 / Published: 20 March 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (8303 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The ion beam facility at the Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, the National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, consists of a cyclotron and three electrostatic accelerators, and they are dedicated to studies of materials science and bio-technology. The paper reviews
[...] Read more.
The ion beam facility at the Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, the National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, consists of a cyclotron and three electrostatic accelerators, and they are dedicated to studies of materials science and bio-technology. The paper reviews this unique accelerator complex in detail from the viewpoint of its configuration, accelerator specification, typical accelerator, or irradiation technologies and ion beam applications. The institute has also irradiation facilities for electron beams and 60Co gamma-rays and has been leading research and development of radiation chemistry for industrial applications in Japan with the facilities since its establishment. The configuration and utilization of those facilities are outlined as well. Full article
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