Special Issue "Nanomechanics of Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene Sheets"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 February 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Xiaoqiao He

1. Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
2.Centre for Advanced Structural Materials, City University of Hong Kong Shenzhen Research Institute, Shenzhen, China
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +852-34424760
Interests: nanomechanics of carbon nanotubes and graphene sheets; nanostructures; computational mechanics; smart structures; multistable structures

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene sheets are promising materials for their super material properties, especially the mechanical properties, including the outstanding strength and selective structures (chirality). A great deal of effort has been spent to address the mechanical characteristics of CNTs and graphene sheets with perfect structure, as well as the structures with defects, such as point defects, line defects for graphene sheets, helical defects for nanotubes, etc. Additionally, as the size of a single CNT is too small and it is difficult to operate single CNTs, CNTs are proposed and used to build CNT networks in order to achieve engineering materials in macro scales. Single-graphene sheet has high mobility, flexibility, robustness and environmental stability, but multilayer graphene sheets are more achievable and welcomed to build various devices. The van der Waals interaction acts as a key issue to enable such layered structures. Furthermore, CNTs and graphene sheets are used as reinforcements or functional materials in matrixes, including organic matrixes, such as epoxy, and inorganic matrixes, such as metals, to produce nanocomposite materials with high performance, such as graphene batteries and supercapacitors. All the applications of the carbon-based nanomaterials are founded on their mechanical properties.

This Special Issue is aimed to outline recent progress on the nanomechanics of CNTs and graphene sheets, especially theoretical and experimental works for relevant applications. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Nanomechanics of CNTs and Graphene sheets;
  • CNT networks and super-graphene sheets;
  • Nanomechanics of CNTs, or graphene sheets, reinforced matrixes;
  • Bending, Buckling, Vibration and Fracture phenomenon in CNT-based nanostructures;
  • Nanomechanics of CNTs- or Graphene sheets-based derives;
  • Other nanomechanical issues of CNTs or graphene sheets.

Dr. Xiaoqiao He
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanomechanics of carbon nanotubes and graphene sheets
  • multiscale simulation of CNTs
  • MD simulation for the mechanical properties of CNTs
  • experimental study of CNTs and graphene sheets
  • nanomechanics of CNT- or graphene sheets-reinforced composites
  • theoretical and experimental investigations of CNTs- or graphene sheets-based nano-devices

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Carbon Nanotube (CNT) Honeycomb Cell Area-Dependent Optical Reflectance
Nanomaterials 2016, 6(11), 202; doi:10.3390/nano6110202
Received: 23 June 2016 / Revised: 29 October 2016 / Accepted: 2 November 2016 / Published: 7 November 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5538 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The relationship between the physical structure of carbon nanotube (CNT) honeycomb structures and their total, diffuse, and specular reflectance is investigated for the first time. It is found that CNT honeycomb structures with average cell areas of smaller than 30 μm2 show
[...] Read more.
The relationship between the physical structure of carbon nanotube (CNT) honeycomb structures and their total, diffuse, and specular reflectance is investigated for the first time. It is found that CNT honeycomb structures with average cell areas of smaller than 30 μm2 show a higher total reflectance. Particularly, a thinner, highly packed CNT (buckypaper) film, along with a larger wall height and higher ratio of wall height to cell area, markedly increase the total reflectance for cell areas smaller than 30 μm2, which means that a higher total area of buckypapers in CNT walls and bottom areas increases the total reflectance, including the diffuse reflectance. It is also found that the total reflection of non-absorbed light in CNT honeycomb structures consists primarily of diffuse reflectance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomechanics of Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene Sheets)
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Open AccessArticle Investigation of the Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Graphene Nanoplatelet-Cement Composite
Nanomaterials 2016, 6(11), 200; doi:10.3390/nano6110200
Received: 27 August 2016 / Revised: 27 October 2016 / Accepted: 28 October 2016 / Published: 4 November 2016
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (5132 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this work, graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) were dispersed uniformly in aqueous solution using methylcellulose (MC) as a dispersing agent via ultrasonic processing. Homogenous GNP suspensions were incorporated into the cement matrix to investigate the effect of GNPs on the mechanical behavior of cement
[...] Read more.
In this work, graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) were dispersed uniformly in aqueous solution using methylcellulose (MC) as a dispersing agent via ultrasonic processing. Homogenous GNP suspensions were incorporated into the cement matrix to investigate the effect of GNPs on the mechanical behavior of cement paste. The optimum concentration ratio of GNPs to MC was confirmed as 1:7 by ultraviolet visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), and the optical microscope and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images displayed remarkable dispersing performance. The GNP–cement composite exhibited better mechanical properties with the help of surface-modified GNPs. The flexural strength of cement paste increased up to 15%–24% with 0.05 wt % GNPs (by weight of cement). Meanwhile, the compressive strength of the GNP–cement composite increased up to 3%–8%. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermal analysis (TG/DTG) demonstrated that the GNPs could accelerate the degree of hydration and increase the amount of hydration products, especially at an early age. Meanwhile, the lower porosity and finer pore size distribution of GNP–cement composite were detected by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). In addition, scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis showed the introduction of GNPs could impede the development of cracks and preserve the completeness of the matrix through the plicate morphology and tortuous behavior of GNPs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomechanics of Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene Sheets)
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Open AccessArticle Ionic Adsorption and Desorption of CNT Nanoropes
Nanomaterials 2016, 6(10), 177; doi:10.3390/nano6100177
Received: 20 July 2016 / Revised: 16 September 2016 / Accepted: 22 September 2016 / Published: 28 September 2016
PDF Full-text (1732 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A nanorope is comprised of several carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with different chiralities. A molecular dynamic model is built to investigate the ionic adsorption and desorption of the CNT nanoropes. The charge distribution on the nanorope is obtained by using a modified gradient method
[...] Read more.
A nanorope is comprised of several carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with different chiralities. A molecular dynamic model is built to investigate the ionic adsorption and desorption of the CNT nanoropes. The charge distribution on the nanorope is obtained by using a modified gradient method based on classical electrostatic theory. The electrostatic interactions among charged carbon atoms are calculated by using the Coulomb law. It was found here that the charged nanorope can adsorb heavy metal ions, and the adsorption and desorption can be realized by controlling the strength of applied electric field. The distance between the ions and the nanorope as well as the amount of ions have an effect on the adsorption capacity of the nanorope. The desorption process takes less time than that of adsorption. The study indicates that the CNT nanorope can be used as a core element of devices for sewage treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomechanics of Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene Sheets)
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Open AccessArticle Study on Utilization of Carboxyl Group Decorated Carbon Nanotubes and Carbonation Reaction for Improving Strengths and Microstructures of Cement Paste
Nanomaterials 2016, 6(8), 153; doi:10.3390/nano6080153
Received: 29 June 2016 / Revised: 10 August 2016 / Accepted: 10 August 2016 / Published: 19 August 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (7675 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Correction
Abstract
Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have excellent mechanical properties and can be used to reinforce cement-based materials. On the other hand, the reaction product of carbonation with hydroxides in hydrated cement paste can reduce the porosity of cement-based materials. In this study, a novel method
[...] Read more.
Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have excellent mechanical properties and can be used to reinforce cement-based materials. On the other hand, the reaction product of carbonation with hydroxides in hydrated cement paste can reduce the porosity of cement-based materials. In this study, a novel method to improve the strength of cement paste was developed through a synergy of carbon nanotubes decorated with carboxyl group and carbonation reactions. The experimental results showed that the carboxyl group (–COOH) of decorated carbon nanotubes and the surfactant can control the morphology of the calcium carbonate crystal of carbonation products in hydrated cement paste. The spindle-like calcium carbonate crystals showed great morphological differences from those observed in the conventional carbonation of cement paste. The spindle-like calcium carbonate crystals can serve as fiber-like reinforcements to reinforce the cement paste. By the synergy of the carbon nanotubes and carbonation reactions, the compressive and flexural strengths of cement paste were significantly improved and increased by 14% and 55%, respectively, when compared to those of plain cement paste. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomechanics of Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene Sheets)
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Open AccessCorrection Correction: Yan, X., et al. Study on Utilization of Carboxyl Group Decorated Carbon Nanotubes and Carbonation Reaction for Improving Strengths and Microstructures of Cement Paste. Nanomaterials 2016, 6, 153
Nanomaterials 2016, 6(10), 185; doi:10.3390/nano6100185
Received: 12 October 2016 / Accepted: 12 October 2016 / Published: 13 October 2016
PDF Full-text (647 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The authors wish to make the following correction to this paper [1].[...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomechanics of Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene Sheets)
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