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Special Issue "Photovoltaic Materials 2012"

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A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials for Energy Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2012)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jean-Michel Nunzi (Website)

Department of Chemistry, Chernoff Hall, Room 310, Queen's University, 90 Bader Lane, Kingston ON, Canada K7L 3N6
Interests: light-matter interaction in organic materials and nanostructures; chiral photonics; organic semiconductors and devices; photovoltaic effect; photo-induced effects and self-organization

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Photovoltaic materials are developing at a fast pace owing to intensive research aimed at lowering the cost, increasing the efficiency and stability of solar cells and modules. Motivation is the development of a sustainable, renewable and unlimited energy resource accessible to the citizens of our global world. With this special issue of the open access journal Materials specially dedicated to Photovoltaic Materials, we aim at offering to the vast internet community of students, engineers and researchers a broad picture of the present status, recent advances and future prospects of photovoltaic materials, their properties, stability and efficiency characteristics upon integration into solar cells and modules.

Submission will concern advanced photovoltaic materials and their application into: amorphous, nano-, poly- and crystalline solar cells; thin film solar cells; compound semiconductor, heterostructures, tandem and multijunction cells; dyes and dye-sensitized cells; quantum-dot, quantum-wire, quantum-well and nano-solar cells; organic and polymer cells.

Prof. Dr. Jean-Michel Nunzi
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • hybrid and nano-structured materials
  • nano-tube, graphene and carbon allotropes
  • biological and green chemistry materials
  • amorphous, nano-, poly- and crystalline semiconductors
  • thin film and compound semiconductors
  • quantum-dot, quantum-wire, quantum-wells
  • dyes organic, and polymer semoconductors
  • heterostructures, tandems and multijunctions
  • up-, down conversion and multi-exciton processes
  • antenna and rectenna photovoltaics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle MoO3 Thickness, Thermal Annealing and Solvent Annealing Effects on Inverted and Direct Polymer Photovoltaic Solar Cells
Materials 2012, 5(12), 2521-2536; doi:10.3390/ma5122521
Received: 1 November 2012 / Revised: 16 November 2012 / Accepted: 19 November 2012 / Published: 27 November 2012
Cited by 14 | PDF Full-text (430 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Several parameters of the fabrication process of inverted polymer bulk heterojunction solar cells based on titanium oxide as an electron selective layer and molybdenum oxide as a hole selective layer were tested in order to achieve efficient organic photovoltaic solar cells. Thermal [...] Read more.
Several parameters of the fabrication process of inverted polymer bulk heterojunction solar cells based on titanium oxide as an electron selective layer and molybdenum oxide as a hole selective layer were tested in order to achieve efficient organic photovoltaic solar cells. Thermal annealing treatment is a common process to achieve optimum morphology, but it proved to be damageable for the performance of this kind of inverted solar cells. We demonstrate using Auger analysis combined with argon etching that diffusion of species occurs from the MoO3/Ag top layers into the active layer upon thermal annealing. In order to achieve efficient devices, the morphology of the bulk heterojunction was then manipulated using the solvent annealing technique as an alternative to thermal annealing. The influence of the MoO3 thickness was studied on inverted, as well as direct, structure. It appeared that only 1 nm-thick MoO3 is enough to exhibit highly efficient devices (PCE = 3.8%) and that increasing the thickness up to 15 nm does not change the device performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photovoltaic Materials 2012)
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Open AccessArticle Guidelines for the Bandgap Combinations and Absorption Windows for Organic Tandem and Triple-Junction Solar Cells
Materials 2012, 5(10), 1933-1953; doi:10.3390/ma5101933
Received: 23 August 2012 / Revised: 8 October 2012 / Accepted: 16 October 2012 / Published: 22 October 2012
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (873 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Organic solar cells have narrow absorption windows, compared to the absorption band of inorganic semiconductors. A possible way to capture a wider band of the solar spectrum—and thus increasing the power conversion efficiency—is using more solar cells with different bandgaps in a [...] Read more.
Organic solar cells have narrow absorption windows, compared to the absorption band of inorganic semiconductors. A possible way to capture a wider band of the solar spectrum—and thus increasing the power conversion efficiency—is using more solar cells with different bandgaps in a row, i.e., a multi-junction solar cell. We calculate the ideal material characteristics (bandgap combinations and absorption windows) for an organic tandem and triple-junction solar cell, as well as their acceptable range. In this way, we give guidelines to organic material designers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photovoltaic Materials 2012)
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