E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Dental Materials"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2011)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jorge Perdigão

University of Minnesota, Department of Restorative Sciences, Division of Operative Dentistry, 515 SE Delaware St, 8-450 Moos Tower, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
Website | E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Dental research has been transitioning gradually from the classical Restorative Dentistry to Regenerative Dentistry. Regeneration of a functional tooth is a promising strategy for replacing an irreversibly diseased tooth. Pulp-like tissue can now be regenerated in root canal space by stem cells and give rise to odontoblast-like cells producing dentin-like tissue. Three-dimensional porous scaffolds made of mineralized type I collagen mimic the composition of extracellular matrix ofbone and can therefore have the potential of being used as a biomimetic graft material. Additionally, the role of RNA interference (RNAi) and RNA activation (RNAa) may prove to be crucial to treat or prevent dental anomalies and periodontal disease.

The role of metalloproteinases (or MMP’s) inhibitors in preventing the degradation of dentinal collagen fibers has been recently highlighted in dentin adhesion. Other promising areas of research in dental adhesion are the application of colloidal platinum nanoparticles, and guided tissue mineralization to re-mineralize areas etched by phosphoric acid but not infiltrated by the adhesive.

Some of the dental materials recently introduced - low-shrinkage resin composites and Y-TZP-based fixed prostheses - have changed some of the classical concepts of clinical dentistry.

For the first time in 40 years, dentists are using a non-BisGMA resin composite. Shrinkage stresses are reduced with the new silorane-based resin composites. The relevance of using low- or no-shrinking composite materials is that internal stresses occur during the polymerization of all dental composites due to a volumetric contraction. These shrinkage stresses may cause interfacial failures between the restoration and the tooth structure.

Yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP) and titanium implants have been increasingly used in Dentistry. Y-TZP is used as the infrastructure for crowns, bridges and implant abutments. Research in Clinical Orthopedics has shown that Y-TZP used in hip arthroplasties may undergo transformation under mechanical and/or hydrothermal stress, with degradation of mechanical and tribologic properties. It is not known if these alterations also occur in Y-TZP dental restorations.

Prof. Dr. Jorge Perdigão
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • nanotechnology in dentistry
  • biocompatibility
  • dental pulp & regeneration
  • scaffold materials
  • stem cells in dentistry
  • dental tissue bioengineering
  • RNA interference
  • dentin ultrastructure & adhesion
  • dentin MMP's & collagen
  • non-shrinking composite materials
  • biodegradation of Y-TZP
  • optimization of dental implant surfaces

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Effect of Heat Treatment on the Physical Properties of Provisional Crowns during Polymerization: An in Vitro Study
Materials 2015, 8(4), 1766-1777; doi:10.3390/ma8041766
Received: 12 December 2014 / Revised: 2 April 2015 / Accepted: 7 April 2015 / Published: 15 April 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1980 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study concerned the effect of heat treatment during setting on the physical properties of four resin-based provisional restorative materials: Duralay (polymethyl methacrylate), Trim II (polyethyl methacrylate), Luxatemp (bis-acrylic composite), and Protemp 4 (bis-acrylic composite). Specimens were prepared at 23, 37, or 60
[...] Read more.
This study concerned the effect of heat treatment during setting on the physical properties of four resin-based provisional restorative materials: Duralay (polymethyl methacrylate), Trim II (polyethyl methacrylate), Luxatemp (bis-acrylic composite), and Protemp 4 (bis-acrylic composite). Specimens were prepared at 23, 37, or 60 °C for evaluation of flexural strength, surface roughness, color change and marginal discrepancy. Flexural strength was determined by a three-point bending test. Surface profile was studied using atomic force microscopy. Color change was evaluated by comparing the color of the materials before and after placement in coffee. A travelling microscope helped prepare standardized crowns for assessment of marginal discrepancy. Flexural strength of all tested materials cured at 23 °C or 37 °C did not significantly change. The surface roughness and marginal discrepancy of the materials increased at 60 °C curing temperature. Marginal discrepancies, color stability, and other physical properties of materials cured at 23 °C or 37 °C did not significantly change. Flexural strength of certain provisional materials cured at 60 °C increased, but there was also an increase in surface roughness and marginal discrepancy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Materials)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Nanotechnology in Dental Sciences: Moving towards a Finer Way of Doing Dentistry
Materials 2010, 3(3), 1674-1691; doi:10.3390/ma3031674
Received: 20 December 2009 / Revised: 11 February 2010 / Accepted: 5 March 2010 / Published: 8 March 2010
Cited by 19 | PDF Full-text (1736 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Nanotechnologies are predicted to revolutionize: (a) the control over materials properties at ultrafine scales; and (b) the sensitivity of tools and devices applied in various scientific and technological fields. In this short review, we argue that dentistry will be no exception to this
[...] Read more.
Nanotechnologies are predicted to revolutionize: (a) the control over materials properties at ultrafine scales; and (b) the sensitivity of tools and devices applied in various scientific and technological fields. In this short review, we argue that dentistry will be no exception to this trend. Here, we present a dynamic view of dental tissues, an adoption of which may lead to finer, more effective and minimally invasive reparation approaches. By doing so, we aim at providing insights into some of the breakthroughs relevant to understanding the genesis of dental tissues at the nanostructural level or generating dental materials with nanoscale critical boundaries. The lineage of the progress of dental science, including the projected path along the presumed nanotechnological direction of research and clinical application is mentioned too. We conclude by claiming that dentistry should follow the trend of probing matter at nanoscale that currently dominates both materials and biological sciences in order to improve on the research strategies and clinical techniques that have traditionally rested on mechanistic assumptions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Materials)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Materials Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
materials@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Materials
Back to Top