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Special Issue "Lung Health, Tuberculosis, and Air Pollution in Low- and Middle-Income Countries"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Kevin Mortimer

Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Pembroke Place, Liverpool L3 5QA, UK
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 00447980958309
Interests: household air pollution; chronic respiratory disease; asthma; Africa
Guest Editor
Dr. Alison Lee

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: household air pollution; environmental exposures across the life course; lung function trajectory; asthma/COPD; Africa

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Non-communicable lung diseases, tuberculosis (TB), and pneumonia are leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Most of this burden falls on the world’s poorest people living in low- and middle-income countries. Non-communicable lung diseases like asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affect approximately 1 in 10 people around the world. Asthma is the commonest chronic disease in childhood. World Health Organization (WHO) data indicate that over 10 million people became ill from TB in 2016, of whom 1.7 million died. Pneumonia is the leading cause of death amongst children under the age of 5 outside the neonatal period. The inhalation of polluted air—including household air pollution, outdoor air pollution, and air pollution from tobacco smoke—is a major cause of lung disease, causing around 13 million deaths globally each year.

Although it is recognized that household air pollution is associated with adverse health outcomes, this issue has received little attention from the research community in relation to the magnitude of the problem, largely because it primarily affects the world’s poor. Around three billion people use solid fuels (animal dung, crop residues, wood, charcoal, coal) to provide energy for their day-to-day cooking and heating needs, including around 700 million people in sub-Saharan Africa. These dirty-burning fuels produce large amounts of partial combustion substances that cause high levels of air pollution both indoors in households and outdoors. The WHO estimates that over four million people die every year as a result of exposure to household air pollution. The morbidity and mortality associated with exposure to household air pollution are linked with poverty and, as such, are a problem especially for the rural poor and for people living in sub-Saharan Africa.

In recognition of the magnitude of the global health challenges represented by lung diseases, tuberculosis, and air pollution, the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health devotes this Special Issue to recent findings in “Lung Health, Tuberculosis, and Air Pollution in Low- and Middle-Income Countries”.

You are invited to submit manuscripts to be considered for publication in this Special Issue. We will particularly welcome submissions from sub-Saharan Africa.

Dr. Kevin Mortimer
Dr. Alison Lee
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Lung diseases
  • Tuberculosis
  • Household air pollution
  • Outdoor air pollution
  • Biomass fuel
  • Low- and middle-income countries
  • Sub-Saharan Africa

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessCommunication The Effect of PM2.5 from Household Combustion on Life Expectancy in Sub-Saharan Africa
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(4), 748; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15040748
Received: 11 March 2018 / Revised: 4 April 2018 / Accepted: 10 April 2018 / Published: 13 April 2018
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Abstract
Household fuel combustion, especially using solid combustibles (biomass and fossil fuels), for cooking and other activities produces emissions that contribute to concentrations of indoor as well as outdoor air pollutants such as particulate matter with diameter smaller than 2.5 μm (PM2.5)
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Household fuel combustion, especially using solid combustibles (biomass and fossil fuels), for cooking and other activities produces emissions that contribute to concentrations of indoor as well as outdoor air pollutants such as particulate matter with diameter smaller than 2.5 μm (PM2.5) that deteriorate health and likely affect life expectancy (LEX). This study investigates the impact of PM2.5 from household combustion on LEX considering several covariates while controlling for ambient PM2.5 generated by other sectors. The generalized method of moments (GMM) model and the panel cointegration model were applied to a dataset of 43 Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) countries over the time period of 1995–2010. Both approaches provide similar results indicating that household PM2.5 is significantly and negatively associated with higher aggregate LEX in the long-run, and, to a greater degree for female’s. Also, among the control variables, PM2.5 from the transport sector has a greater influence on male’s LEX. Thus, efforts should be combined to reduce household PM2.5 since lower levels are associated with increased LEX. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Cooking Fuels in Lagos, Nigeria: Factors Associated with Household Choice of Kerosene or Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG)
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(4), 641; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15040641
Received: 4 March 2018 / Revised: 26 March 2018 / Accepted: 28 March 2018 / Published: 31 March 2018
PDF Full-text (369 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Cooking with dirty-burning fuels is associated with health risk from household air pollution. We assessed the prevalence of and factors associated with the use of cooking fuels, and attitudes and barriers towards use of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). This was a cross-sectional, population-based
[...] Read more.
Cooking with dirty-burning fuels is associated with health risk from household air pollution. We assessed the prevalence of and factors associated with the use of cooking fuels, and attitudes and barriers towards use of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). This was a cross-sectional, population-based survey conducted in 519 households in Lagos, Nigeria. We used a structured questionnaire to obtain information regarding choice of household cooking fuel and the attitudes towards the use of LPG. Kerosene was the most frequently used cooking fuel (n = 475, 91.5%; primary use n = 364, 70.1%) followed by charcoal (n = 159, 30.6%; primary use n = 88, 17%) and LPG (n = 86, 16.6%; primary use n = 63, 12.1%). Higher level of education, higher income and younger age were associated with LPG vs. kerosene use. Fuel expenditure on LPG was significantly lower than for kerosene ( N (Naira) 2169.0 ± 1507.0 vs. N 2581.6 ± 1407.5). Over 90% of non-LPG users were willing to switch to LPG but cited safety issues and high cost as potential barriers to switching. Our findings suggest that misinformation and beliefs regarding benefits, safety and cost of LPG are important barriers to LPG use. An educational intervention program could be a cost-effective approach to improve LPG adoption and should be formally addressed through a well-designed community-based intervention study. Full article
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