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Special Issue "Advances in Environmental Economics"

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A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2010)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Alan Carlin

1 Consultant, environmental economics, 9200 Leamington Court, Fairfax, VA 22031, USA
2 US Environmental Protection Agency, National Center for Environmental Economics, Washington, DC, USA
E-Mail
Interests: Environmental economics research and policy; environmental science; economics and science of global climate change control; development economics; energy economics and science; transportation economics; project evaluation and cost-benefit analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Environmental economics developed into a separate specialty primarily as a result of the rapid growth of the environmental movement and governmental responses to it starting in the late 1960s and early 1970s. It drew on neoclassical economic theory and applied it to the analysis of environmental policy issues and governmental proposals to respond to them. It has advanced primarily on the basis of its relevance to increasing interest in environmental public policy issues and of its strong foundations in neoclassical economics. This special issue will endeavor to continue this successful approach by publishing research that has relevance to environmental policy issues of current and likely future interest using a neoclassical approach. This embraces empirical applications, methods development, and theoretical research. For example, development of new or improved benefit measurement techniques to determine the economic benefits of pollution control has such relevance if the techniques appear likely to be useful in measuring the economic benefits of proposed environmental control measures now in place or likely to be put in place in the future.

The special issue is open to any subject in environmental economics as long as it meets the characteristics described above. The listed keywords suggest just a few of the many possibilities.

Alan Carlin, Phd
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • environmental economics
  • environmental policy
  • stated preference
  • revealed preference
  • cost of damages avoided
  • benefit-cost analysis
  • cost-effectiveness
  • economic incentives
  • economic distribution and equity

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Survey Mode Effects on Valuation of Environmental Goods
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2011, 8(4), 1222-1243; doi:10.3390/ijerph8041222
Received: 10 March 2011 / Revised: 12 April 2011 / Accepted: 13 April 2011 / Published: 18 April 2011
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (385 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This article evaluates the effect of the choice of survey recruitment mode on the value of water quality in lakes, rivers, and streams. Four different modes are compared: bringing respondents to one central location after phone recruitment, mall intercepts in two states, national
[...] Read more.
This article evaluates the effect of the choice of survey recruitment mode on the value of water quality in lakes, rivers, and streams. Four different modes are compared: bringing respondents to one central location after phone recruitment, mall intercepts in two states, national phone-mail survey, and an Internet survey with a national, probability-based panel. The modes differ in terms of the representativeness of the samples, non-response rates, sample selection effects, and consistency of responses. The article also shows that the estimated value of water quality can differ substantially depending on the survey mode. The national Internet panel has the most desirable properties with respect to performance on the four important survey dimensions of interest. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Environmental Economics)
Open AccessArticle A Multidisciplinary, Science-Based Approach to the Economics of Climate Change
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2011, 8(4), 985-1031; doi:10.3390/ijerph8040985
Received: 4 January 2011 / Revised: 17 March 2011 / Accepted: 21 March 2011 / Published: 1 April 2011
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (1099 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Economic analyses of environmental mitigation and other interdisciplinary public policy issues can be much more useful if they critically examine what other disciplines have to say, insist on using the most relevant observational data and the scientific method, and examine lower cost alternatives
[...] Read more.
Economic analyses of environmental mitigation and other interdisciplinary public policy issues can be much more useful if they critically examine what other disciplines have to say, insist on using the most relevant observational data and the scientific method, and examine lower cost alternatives to the change proposed. These general principles are illustrated by applying them to the case of climate change mitigation, one of the most interdisciplinary of public policy issues. The analysis shows how use of these principles leads to quite different conclusions than those of most previous such economic analyses, as follows: The economic benefits of reducing CO2 emissions may be about two orders of magnitude less than those estimated by most economists because the climate sensitivity factor (CSF) is much lower than assumed by the United Nations because feedback is negative rather than positive and the effects of CO2 emissions reductions on atmospheric CO2 appear to be short rather than long lasting. The costs of CO2 emissions reductions are very much higher than usually estimated because of technological and implementation problems recently identified. Geoengineering such as solar radiation management is a controversial alternative to CO2 emissions reductions that offers opportunities to greatly decrease these large costs, change global temperatures with far greater assurance of success, and eliminate the possibility of low probability, high consequence risks of rising temperatures, but has been largely ignored by economists. CO2 emissions reductions are economically unattractive since the very modest benefits remaining after the corrections for the above effects are quite unlikely to economically justify the much higher costs unless much lower cost geoengineering is used. The risk of catastrophic anthropogenic global warming appears to be so low that it is not currently worth doing anything to try to control it, including geoengineering. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Environmental Economics)
Open AccessArticle Climate Change and Vector-borne Diseases: An Economic Impact Analysis of Malaria in Africa
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2011, 8(3), 913-930; doi:10.3390/ijerph8030913
Received: 17 February 2011 / Revised: 18 March 2011 / Accepted: 21 March 2011 / Published: 23 March 2011
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (593 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A semi-parametric econometric model is used to study the relationship between malaria cases and climatic factors in 25 African countries. Results show that a marginal change in temperature and precipitation levels would lead to a significant change in the number of malaria cases
[...] Read more.
A semi-parametric econometric model is used to study the relationship between malaria cases and climatic factors in 25 African countries. Results show that a marginal change in temperature and precipitation levels would lead to a significant change in the number of malaria cases for most countries by the end of the century. Consistent with the existing biophysical malaria model results, the projected effects of climate change are mixed. Our model projects that some countries will see an increase in malaria cases but others will see a decrease. We estimate projected malaria inpatient and outpatient treatment costs as a proportion of annual 2000 health expenditures per 1,000 people. We found that even under minimal climate change scenario, some countries may see their inpatient treatment cost of malaria increase more than 20%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Environmental Economics)
Open AccessArticle Information Sharing and Environmental Policies
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2010, 7(10), 3561-3578; doi:10.3390/ijerph7103561
Received: 20 August 2010 / Revised: 25 September 2010 / Accepted: 29 September 2010 / Published: 11 October 2010
PDF Full-text (228 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Based on the assumption that in a standard eco-dumping model governments are uncertain about future product demand and allowing governments to obtain information from firms, we examine governments’ and firms’ incentives to share information. We show that when governments regulate polluting firms through
[...] Read more.
Based on the assumption that in a standard eco-dumping model governments are uncertain about future product demand and allowing governments to obtain information from firms, we examine governments’ and firms’ incentives to share information. We show that when governments regulate polluting firms through emission standards, then governments and firms will reach an agreement concerning information sharing. The opposite holds when governments regulate pollution through emission taxes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Environmental Economics)

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