Special Issue "Humanity’s Future"

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A special issue of Humanities (ISSN 2076-0787).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2015

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Robert G. Bednarik
International Federation of Rock Art Organisations (IFRAO), PO Box 216, Caulfield South, Vic. 3162, Australia
Website: http://mc2.vicnet.net.au/home/auraweb/web/index.html
E-Mail: auranet@optusnet.com.au
Interests: pleistocene archaeology; epistemology; rock art; prehistoric art; cave art; dating methodology; archaeometry; pleistocene seafaring; human evolution

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues

This is a proposal for a special theme issue of Humanities. For a new journal to establish itself effectively, it is essential that it feature a theme that is of universal appeal and can attract wide attention not only in the scientific and humanities communities, but also in the wider public. One of the timeliest themes in this era of uncertainties about the sustainability of humanity and its demands on this planet is surely the question of the future of our species. One can either speculate about the developments of our technology and society, which has been done many times; or one can delve deeply into the human past and develop plausible trajectories of how humans got to where they are now, and then extrapolate from these known trajectories into the future, to see where they might take us. Naturally, in some areas such predictions would be subject to significant unknowns, but with the majority of variables, extrapolation would be perfectly reasonable to create credible scenarios. For instance the development of the brain and all it entails is likely to continue on its present course, as is the development of pathologies, human cognition, the genome, and of human physiology. In most of the factors that make up what we are and are likely to become, rationalizations about the future are perfectly reasonable, especially if the principal moderating influences can be accounted for.
On this basis it is proposed to explore the past trajectories of such aspects as human ecology, human biology, pathology, physiology, evolutionary biology, genetics (populations, molecular, behavioral), endocrinology, neuroscience and cognitive science, in order to determine the most likely future directions in their development. This should lead to realistic predictions of the future of our in many ways troubled species.

Dr. Robert G.Bednarik
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • archaeology
  • paleoanthropology
  • human evolution
  • paleogenetics
  • paleopathology
  • neuroscience
  • neuropsychology
  • cognitive science
  • human ecology

Published Papers (10 papers)

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p. 442-516
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Humanities 2014, 3(4), 442-516; doi:10.3390/h3040442
Received: 19 August 2014; in revised form: 6 September 2014 / Accepted: 15 September 2014 / Published: 2 October 2014
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Humanity’s Future)
p. 278-291
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Humanities 2013, 2(2), 278-291; doi:10.3390/h2020278
Received: 29 April 2013; in revised form: 21 May 2013 / Accepted: 28 May 2013 / Published: 5 June 2013
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p. 209-252
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Humanities 2013, 2(2), 209-252; doi:10.3390/h2020209
Received: 3 March 2013; in revised form: 23 April 2013 / Accepted: 27 April 2013 / Published: 21 May 2013
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p. 147-159
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Humanities 2013, 2(2), 147-159; doi:10.3390/h2020147
Received: 29 November 2012; in revised form: 19 March 2013 / Accepted: 21 March 2013 / Published: 2 April 2013
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p. 119-127
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Humanities 2013, 2(2), 119-127; doi:10.3390/h2020119
Received: 15 January 2013; in revised form: 21 March 2013 / Accepted: 21 March 2013 / Published: 26 March 2013
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p. 20-55
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Humanities 2013, 2(1), 20-55; doi:10.3390/h2010020
Received: 22 October 2012; in revised form: 28 November 2012 / Accepted: 28 November 2012 / Published: 9 January 2013
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p. 1-19
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Humanities 2013, 2(1), 1-19; doi:10.3390/h2010001
Received: 20 November 2012; in revised form: 17 December 2012 / Accepted: 26 December 2012 / Published: 4 January 2013
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p. 205-228
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Humanities 2012, 1(3), 205-228; doi:10.3390/h1030205
Received: 26 October 2012; in revised form: 26 November 2012 / Accepted: 27 November 2012 / Published: 10 December 2012
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p. 178-191
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Humanities 2012, 1(3), 178-191; doi:10.3390/h1030178
Received: 23 October 2012; in revised form: 12 November 2012 / Accepted: 19 November 2012 / Published: 28 November 2012
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p. 145-165
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Humanities 2012, 1(3), 145-165; doi:10.3390/h1030145
Received: 18 July 2012; in revised form: 27 September 2012 / Accepted: 8 October 2012 / Published: 15 October 2012
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Last update: 25 April 2014

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