Special Issue "Semantics in the Future Internet"

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A special issue of Future Internet (ISSN 1999-5903).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (22 October 2010)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Anna Fensel (Website)

FTW Forschungszentrum Telekommunikation Wien GmbH, Donau-City-Straße 1, 3. Stock, A1220 Vienna, Austria
Phone: +43 15 05 28 30 45
Fax: +43 15 05 28 30 99
Guest Editor
Dr. Dumitru Roman

SINTEF, Forskningsveien 1, Blindern 0314 Oslo, Norway
Phone: +47 2206 7647

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue publishes revised selected contributions from the workshops of the 3rd Future Internet Symposium 2010 (FIS’10: http://www.fis2010.org): Towards a Converged, Consolidated and Sustainable Future Internet. FIS’10 is a venue for European and international researchers to share their work on next generation Internet technologies. FIS is a scientific forum for the European Union's Future Internet Initiative, an effort to align European Internet research on the shared challenges presented by Europe's increasingly Internet-based society and economy. Six accepted FIS’10 workshops (http://www.fis2010.org/program/accepted-workshops) contribute to serving the interest of the emerging community and foster new researchers as they progress to become the new leaders in this emerging field.

In the last years, semantic technologies have gained an increasing interest and impact in various fields and industry, like e-Science, publishing and content-based business, telecommunications. Numerous Future Internet infrastructures and services have a potential to leverage on and benefit from the large amounts of shared machine processable (i.e., semantic) data that becomes available, often freely (particularly, as Linked Open Data Cloud: http://linkeddata.org), on the Internet and in the companies’ intranets.

Particular areas of interest in this special issue include development of semantic technologies for Internet of Services, Internet of Things and Internet of Content, as well as employment of semantics in related application fields, such as telecommunication networks, smart ubiquitous environments, traffic telematics, energy efficiency, multimedia, e-business, etc. See also the general topics of FIS’10: http://www.fis2010.org/calls/call-for-papers.

Dr. Anna Fensel
Dr. Dumitru Roman
Guest Editors

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Enterprise Coordination on the Internet
Future Internet 2011, 3(1), 49-66; doi:10.3390/fi3010049
Received: 11 November 2010 / Accepted: 11 January 2011 / Published: 17 February 2011
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Abstract
Enterprises are now connected internally and externally to other Enterprises via the Internet in ways that are increasingly difficult to manage, especially as these interconnections become more dynamic. Current methods of coordinating the effects of change as they propagate through these networks [...] Read more.
Enterprises are now connected internally and externally to other Enterprises via the Internet in ways that are increasingly difficult to manage, especially as these interconnections become more dynamic. Current methods of coordinating the effects of change as they propagate through these networks of connections are not likely to scale. What is needed is a new paradigm for how the Internet supports such coordination. Indeed, the Internet should and could provide fundamental coordination functions that are missing today. In this paper, we describe how such a “Coordinated Internet” would work (this paper is an expanded version of [1]). The key functionality of a Coordinated Internet would be that the Internet actively watches what people do (analogous to search completion on desktops today), correlates these activities, and actively notifies people when and how their current tasks affect and are affected by the activities of other people. This would be accomplished by standard coordination functions implemented as a common Internet layer that can be used as a utility by more specialized applications. Such a Coordinated Internet would revolutionize enterprise management, for all enterprises, large and small, corporate and personal. For example, static workflows would become obsolete for all but the the most routine processes. Some solutions provide existence proofs of such a coordination substrate, such as the Redux solution in concurrent engineering, which we describe herein. However, foundational research remains to be done in the new field of Coordination Engineering in order to reach the goal of a future Internet in which coordination functions are fundamental. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Semantics in the Future Internet)
Open AccessArticle A Distributed Public Key Infrastructure Based on Threshold Cryptography for the HiiMap Next Generation Internet Architecture
Future Internet 2011, 3(1), 14-30; doi:10.3390/fi3010014
Received: 12 January 2011 / Revised: 29 January 2011 / Accepted: 30 January 2011 / Published: 1 February 2011
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1154 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this article, a security extension for the HiiMap Next Generation Internet Architecture is presented. We regard a public key infrastructure which is integrated into the mapping infrastructure of the locator/identifier-split addressing scheme. The security approach is based on Threshold Cryptography which [...] Read more.
In this article, a security extension for the HiiMap Next Generation Internet Architecture is presented. We regard a public key infrastructure which is integrated into the mapping infrastructure of the locator/identifier-split addressing scheme. The security approach is based on Threshold Cryptography which enables a sharing of keys among the mapping servers. Hence, a more trustworthy and fair approach for a Next Generation Internet Architecture as compared to the state of the art approach is fostered. Additionally, we give an evaluation based on IETF AAA recommendations for security-related systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Semantics in the Future Internet)
Open AccessArticle On Using TPM for Secure Identities in Future Home Networks
Future Internet 2011, 3(1), 1-13; doi:10.3390/fi3010001
Received: 28 October 2010 / Accepted: 28 December 2010 / Published: 7 January 2011
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (196 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Security should be integrated into future networks from the beginning, not as an extension. Secure identities and authentication schemes are an important step to fulfill this quest. In this article, we argue that home networks are a natural trust anchor for such [...] Read more.
Security should be integrated into future networks from the beginning, not as an extension. Secure identities and authentication schemes are an important step to fulfill this quest. In this article, we argue that home networks are a natural trust anchor for such schemes. We describe our concept of home networks as a universal point of reference for authentication, trust and access control, and show that our scheme can be applied to any next generation network. As home networks are no safe place, we apply Trusted Computing technology to prevent the abuse of identities, i.e., identity theft. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Semantics in the Future Internet)
Open AccessArticle Improving Anomaly Detection for Text-Based Protocols by Exploiting Message Structures
Future Internet 2010, 2(4), 662-669; doi:10.3390/fi2040662
Received: 23 October 2010 / Revised: 16 December 2010 / Accepted: 17 December 2010 / Published: 21 December 2010
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Abstract
Service platforms using text-based protocols need to be protected against attacks. Machine-learning algorithms with pattern matching can be used to detect even previously unknown attacks. In this paper, we present an extension to known Support Vector Machine (SVM) based anomaly detection algorithms [...] Read more.
Service platforms using text-based protocols need to be protected against attacks. Machine-learning algorithms with pattern matching can be used to detect even previously unknown attacks. In this paper, we present an extension to known Support Vector Machine (SVM) based anomaly detection algorithms for the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP). Our contribution is to extend the amount of different features used for classification (feature space) by exploiting the structure of SIP messages, which reduces the false positive rate. Additionally, we show how combining our approach with attribute reduction significantly improves throughput. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Semantics in the Future Internet)
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