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Special Issue "Lithium-ion Batteries"

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A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 January 2010)

Keywords

  • Li-ion battery
  • battery design
  • battery efficiency
  • battery life and life cycle

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Optimization and Characterization of Lithium Ion Cathode Materials in the System (1 – x – y)LiNi0.8Co0.2O2 • xLi2MnO3 • yLiCoO2
Energies 2010, 3(4), 847-865; doi:10.3390/en3040847
Received: 17 February 2010 / Accepted: 1 April 2010 / Published: 21 April 2010
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (1006 KB) | Retraction
Abstract This paper has been retracted on 31 August 2011. A Retraction note is published in Energies, 2011, 4, 1336 Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lithium-ion Batteries)

Review

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Open AccessReview A High Capacity Li-Ion Cathode: The Fe(III/VI) Super-Iron Cathode
Energies 2010, 3(5), 960-972; doi:10.3390/en3050960
Received: 31 March 2010 / Accepted: 12 April 2010 / Published: 6 May 2010
Cited by 18 | PDF Full-text (1354 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A super-iron Li-ion cathode with a 3-fold higher reversible capacity (a storage capacity of 485 mAh/g) is presented. One of the principle constraints to vehicle electrification is that the Li-ion cathode battery chemistry is massive, and expensive. Demonstrated is a 3 electron storage
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A super-iron Li-ion cathode with a 3-fold higher reversible capacity (a storage capacity of 485 mAh/g) is presented. One of the principle constraints to vehicle electrification is that the Li-ion cathode battery chemistry is massive, and expensive. Demonstrated is a 3 electron storage lithium cathodic chemistry, and a reversible Li super-iron battery, which has a significantly higher capacity than contemporary Li-ion batteries. The super-iron Li-ion cathode consists of the hexavalent iron (Fe(VI)) salt, Na2FeO4, and is formed from inexpensive and clean materials. The charge storage mechanism is fundamentally different from those of traditional lithium ion intercalation cathodes. Instead, charge storage is based on multi-electron faradaic reduction, which considerably enhances the intrinsic charge storage capacity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lithium-ion Batteries)
Open AccessReview Surface-Modified Membrane as A Separator for Lithium-Ion Polymer Battery
Energies 2010, 3(4), 866-885; doi:10.3390/en3040866
Received: 26 January 2010 / Revised: 21 February 2010 / Accepted: 26 February 2010 / Published: 23 April 2010
Cited by 42 | PDF Full-text (1287 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper describes the fabrication of novel modified polyethylene (PE) membranes using plasma technology to create high-performance and cost-effective separator membranes for practical applications in lithium-ion polymer batteries. The modified PE membrane via plasma modification process plays a critical role in improving wettability
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This paper describes the fabrication of novel modified polyethylene (PE) membranes using plasma technology to create high-performance and cost-effective separator membranes for practical applications in lithium-ion polymer batteries. The modified PE membrane via plasma modification process plays a critical role in improving wettability and electrolyte retention, interfacial adhesion between separators and electrodes, and cycle performance of lithium-ion polymer batteries. This paper suggests that the performance of lithium-ion polymer batteries can be greatly enhanced by the plasma modification of commercial separators with proper functional materials for targeted application. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lithium-ion Batteries)
Open AccessReview Electrolytes and Interphasial Chemistry in Li Ion Devices
Energies 2010, 3(1), 135-154; doi:10.3390/en3010135
Received: 2 November 2009 / Accepted: 15 January 2010 / Published: 26 January 2010
Cited by 47 | PDF Full-text (2026 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Since its appearance in 1991, the Li ion battery has been the major power source driving the rapid digitalization of our daily life; however, much of the processes and mechanisms underpinning this newest battery chemistry remains poorly understood. As in any electrochemical device,
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Since its appearance in 1991, the Li ion battery has been the major power source driving the rapid digitalization of our daily life; however, much of the processes and mechanisms underpinning this newest battery chemistry remains poorly understood. As in any electrochemical device, the major challenge comes from the electrolyte/electrode interfaces, where the discontinuity in charge distribution and extreme disequality in electric forces induce diversified processes that eventually determine the kinetics of Li+ intercalation chemistry. This article will summarize the most recent efforts on the fundamental understanding of the interphases in Li ion devices. Emphasis will be placed on the formation chemistry of the so-called “SEI” on graphitic anode, the effect of solvation sheath structure of Li+ on the intercalation energy barrier, and the feasibility of tailoring a desired interphase. Biologically inspired approaches to an ideal interphase will also be briefly discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lithium-ion Batteries)

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