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Special Issue "Technologies to Achieve Greenhouse Gas Mitigation"

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A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2011)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Peter Flynn

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G2G8, Canada

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A global consensus is emerging on the need to mitigate the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. This will require technical adaptation of existing energy technologies and the development of new ones. Research, development and commercial application of new technologies focused on a reduced GHG impact are widespread. This issue is dedicated to those technologies that have the potential to impact GHG accumulation in the atmosphere.

Prof. Dr. Peter Flynn
Guest Editor

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Valuing Expansions of the Electricity Transmission Network under Uncertainty: The Binodal Case
Energies 2011, 4(10), 1696-1727; doi:10.3390/en4101696
Received: 1 August 2011 / Revised: 27 September 2011 / Accepted: 12 October 2011 / Published: 21 October 2011
PDF Full-text (633 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Transmission investments are currently needed to meet an increasing electricity demand, to address security of supply concerns, and to reach carbon-emissions targets. A key issue when assessing the benefits from an expanded grid concerns the valuation of the uncertain cash flows that [...] Read more.
Transmission investments are currently needed to meet an increasing electricity demand, to address security of supply concerns, and to reach carbon-emissions targets. A key issue when assessing the benefits from an expanded grid concerns the valuation of the uncertain cash flows that result from the expansion. We propose a valuation model that accommodates both physical and economic uncertainties following the Real Options approach. It combines optimization techniques with Monte Carlo simulation. We illustrate the use of our model in a simplified, two-node grid and assess the decision whether to invest or not in a particular upgrade. The generation mix includes coal- and natural gas-fired stations that operate under carbon constraints. The underlying parameters are estimated from observed market data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technologies to Achieve Greenhouse Gas Mitigation)
Open AccessArticle Cost Benefit Analysis of Using Clean Energy Supplies to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Global Automotive Manufacturing
Energies 2011, 4(10), 1478-1494; doi:10.3390/en4101478
Received: 14 July 2011 / Revised: 19 September 2011 / Accepted: 22 September 2011 / Published: 28 September 2011
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (344 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Automotive manufacturing is energy-intensive. The consumed energy contributes to the generation of significant amounts of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by the automotive manufacturing industry. In this paper, a study is conducted on assessing the application potential of such clean energy power systems [...] Read more.
Automotive manufacturing is energy-intensive. The consumed energy contributes to the generation of significant amounts of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by the automotive manufacturing industry. In this paper, a study is conducted on assessing the application potential of such clean energy power systems as solar PV, wind and fuel cells in reducing the GHG emissions of the global auto manufacturing industry. The study is conducted on the representative solar PV, wind and fuel cell clean energy systems available on the commercial market in six representative locations of GM’s global facilities, including the United States, Mexico, Brazil, China, Egypt and Germany. The results demonstrate that wind power is superior to other two clean energy technologies in the economic performance of the GHG mitigation effect. Among these six selected countries, the highest GHG emission mitigation potential is in China, through wind power supply. The maximum GHG reduction could be up to 60 tons per $1,000 economic investment on wind energy supply in China. The application of wind power systems in the United States and Germany could also obtain relatively high GHG reductions of between 40–50 tons per $1,000 economic input. When compared with wind energy, the use of solar and fuel cell power systems have much less potential for GHG mitigation in the six countries selected. The range of median GHG mitigation values resulting from solar and wind power supply are almost at the same level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technologies to Achieve Greenhouse Gas Mitigation)

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