Special Issue "Emission Impacts on Aerosol-Climate Feedbacks"

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A special issue of Climate (ISSN 2225-1154).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Nicole Mölders (Website)

Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Geophysical Institute and College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 903, Koyukuk Drive, Fairbanks, AK 99775-7320, USA
Phone: +1 907 474 7910
Fax: +1 907 474 7290
Interests: human and natural impacts on weather; air quality and climate; land-cover/use impacts on cloud and precipitation formation; pollution in remote locations; wind energy; evaluation of air-quality model results

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Emissions from anthropogenic and natural sources alter the composition of the atmosphere and hence its radiative properties. In addition, emitted particulate matter and gas-to-particle conversion may provide cloud condensation nuclei that affect cloud and precipitation formation. The main objective of this special issue is to discuss how past, current and future changes in emissions at various scales affect climate in the regions of the emissions themselves as well as in their downwind.

Prof. Dr. Dr. Nicole Mölders
Editor-in-Chief

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Climate is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript.

The Article Processing Charge (APC) for this special issue will be waived for well-prepared manuscripts. English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript.

Research articles as well as review articles are welcome.

Keywords

  • natural and anthropogenic emission
  • cloud-aerosol feedback
  • cloud and precipitation formation
  • water and energy cycle
  • air quality trends
  • advection of polluted air mass
  • short- and long-term urban, rural and natural pollution impacts on climate
  • primary and secondary pollution trends

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Satellite-Detected Carbon Monoxide Pollution during 2000–2012: Examining Global Trends and also Regional Anthropogenic Periods over China, the EU and the USA
Climate 2014, 2(1), 1-16; doi:10.3390/cli2010001
Received: 23 December 2013 / Revised: 5 February 2014 / Accepted: 6 February 2014 / Published: 13 February 2014
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Abstract
In this paper, we test if any statistically significant periodicities are detectable in carbon monoxide emissions over China, the European Union, and the United States of America. To do this, we performed a period analysis using 10 years of daily-averaged data, from [...] Read more.
In this paper, we test if any statistically significant periodicities are detectable in carbon monoxide emissions over China, the European Union, and the United States of America. To do this, we performed a period analysis using 10 years of daily-averaged data, from the Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere (MOPITT) instrument. Besides a seasonal period, we found no clearly detectable periods at any timescale with the exception of a strong signal at 2.28 days. This period was observed over all tested regions and persisted when larger (hemisphere-wide) regions were considered. However, rather than resulting from a physical variation in carbon monoxide, it resulted from day-to-day changes in the area covered by MOPITT on-board its polar-orbiting satellite platform. We also examined linear trends over the dataset, and found that MOPITT identifies several centers of increasing carbon monoxide concentration—the largest being over China—although globally MOPITT reports a significant decrease in carbon monoxide has occurred over the past decade. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emission Impacts on Aerosol-Climate Feedbacks)
Open AccessArticle Exploring Aerosol Effects on Rainfall for Brisbane, Australia
Climate 2013, 1(3), 120-147; doi:10.3390/cli1030120
Received: 23 April 2013 / Revised: 30 July 2013 / Accepted: 7 October 2013 / Published: 28 October 2013
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Abstract
The majority of studies assessing aerosol effects on rainfall use coarse spatial scale (1° latitude/longitude or more) and multi-seasonal or decadal data sets. Here, we present results from a spatial correlation of aerosol size distribution and rain rate for selected stratiform and [...] Read more.
The majority of studies assessing aerosol effects on rainfall use coarse spatial scale (1° latitude/longitude or more) and multi-seasonal or decadal data sets. Here, we present results from a spatial correlation of aerosol size distribution and rain rate for selected stratiform and cumuliform precipitation events. The chemistry transport version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model was used to estimate aerosol parameters during rain events Aerosol maps were then compared with observations of rainfall using geostatistics for the first time. The cross-variogram analysis showed that anthropogenic aerosol was associated with areas of less intense rain within the stratiform system studied. For cumuliform systems, cross-variogram analysis found that anthropogenic emissions may be associated with enhanced rain downwind of aerosol emissions. We conclude that geostatistics provides a promising new technique to investigate relationships between aerosols and rainfall at spatial scales of 1 km which complements more commonly used methods to study aerosol effects on rainfall. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emission Impacts on Aerosol-Climate Feedbacks)

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