Special Issue "Risk Management Challenges: Mitigate the Risk from Natural Hazards"

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A special issue of Challenges (ISSN 2078-1547).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 May 2012)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Douglas Paton (Website)

School of Psychology, University of Tasmania, Newnham Campus, Building O, 004 Newnham, 7248 Tasmania, Australia
Fax: +61 3 6324 3168
Interests: community resilience; risk communication; cross cultural risk management; community recovery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Within minutes of the March 2011 earthquake in Japan, news media provided unprecedented coverage of an unfolding natural catastrophe. Events such as this place natural disasters firmly in the public eye but only for a short time. It falls to the research community to learn the lessons offered by these events and turn them into opportunities for developing more effective risk management and mitigation strategies and identifying the factors that contribute to the vulnerability and resilience of communities and response and recovery agencies. Disasters such as the Japanese tsunami also highlight the ever-present need for systematic, rigorous research into the risk posed by natural hazards and how these risks can be managed. Of course it is vital to ensure that the findings from such research endeavours are disseminated to those who can use the findings.

This means that journals that disseminate these lessons are important resilience and adaptive resources for all those involved in risk and disaster management. Journals such as Challenges provide outlets for scholarly and professional debate on the causes and consequences of disasters and how their effects may be mitigated and managed. This special edition of Challenges will give voice to research into the causes of human and societal losses and ensure that the lessons learned from such disasters can be readily disseminated to the humanitarian, academic and political arenas where that knowledge can provide the evidence base necessary to inform effective risk management intervention.

Prof. Dr. Douglas Paton
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • disaster risk reduction
  • land use planning
  • structural mitigation
  • warning systems
  • evacuation
  • resilience
  • vulnerability
  • risk management
  • community
  • disaster preparedness
  • recovery planning

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Assessing the Relationship Between Hazard Mitigation Plan Quality and Rural Status in a Cohort of 57 Counties from 3 States in the Southeastern U.S.
Challenges 2012, 3(2), 183-193; doi:10.3390/challe3020183
Received: 13 April 2012 / Revised: 27 July 2012 / Accepted: 28 July 2012 / Published: 13 August 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (897 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Rural counties face unique challenges with regard to disaster vulnerability and resilience. We compared the quality of hazard mitigation plans (HMPs) completed in accordance with provisions of the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 from 21 urban and 36 rural counties in three [...] Read more.
Rural counties face unique challenges with regard to disaster vulnerability and resilience. We compared the quality of hazard mitigation plans (HMPs) completed in accordance with provisions of the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 from 21 urban and 36 rural counties in three southeastern states. HMPs were content analyzed to calculate a score for six principles of plan quality. Generalized linear models were used to assess how the mean number of items within each of the six principles was related to urban status, adjusting for total county population and state-level differences. Adjusted mean ratios were higher in urban areas for goals, fact base, policies and participation. Rural areas performed better than urban counterparts in both implementation and monitoring and inter-organizational coordination. Our results suggest that there are important differences in hazard mitigation plan quality between urban and rural counties. Future research should explore characteristics of urban and rural counties that explain the observed differences, and whether such differences can help explain the inequalities in response and recovery to disasters between urban and rural counties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk Management Challenges: Mitigate the Risk from Natural Hazards)
Open AccessArticle Resilience, Sustainability and Risk Management: A Focus on Energy
Challenges 2012, 3(2), 153-182; doi:10.3390/challe3020153
Received: 1 May 2012 / Revised: 21 June 2012 / Accepted: 23 July 2012 / Published: 8 August 2012
Cited by 18 | PDF Full-text (583 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The natural and subsequent human disasters of March 11, 2011 in Japan have brought into focus more than ever the importance of resilience and risk mitigation in the construction of energy infrastructure. This article introduces some of the critical issues and discusses [...] Read more.
The natural and subsequent human disasters of March 11, 2011 in Japan have brought into focus more than ever the importance of resilience and risk mitigation in the construction of energy infrastructure. This article introduces some of the critical issues and discusses the implications of energy in alleviating or exacerbating the risks of natural disasters. Additionally, it presents a framework for considering the risks of energy systems from a broad perspective. The connection is drawn between design for sustainability and the risks associated with energy systems in natural disasters. As a result of the assessment, six criteria are proposed for energy systems to contribute to societal resilience in the face of natural disasters—they should be: (1) Continuous; (2) Robust; (3) Independent; (4) Controllable; (5) Non-hazardous; and (6) Matched to demand. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk Management Challenges: Mitigate the Risk from Natural Hazards)
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