Special Issue "Epidemiologic Research and Cancer"

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A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2010)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Denise Boudreau

Group Health Center for Health Studies & Affiliate Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Outcomes Research and Policy Program, Department of Pharmacy, University of Washington, 1730 Minor Ave, Suite 1600, Seattle, WA 98101, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1 206 287 2067
Fax: +1 206 287 2871

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In regards to research on the epidemiologic of cancer, possible topics of interest may include: prevalence, incidence, mortality of overall and site-specific cancers (including trends and disparities); recurrence and progression of disease; risk factors (e.g., environmental, genetic, behavioral, medical conditions/co-morbidities, and medication use); trends in disease severity (e.g., stage, metastases); role of prevention, screening, and surveillance (including new diagnostic tests) on the epidemic; clinical and economic consequences; and prognosis and survival.

Dr. Denise Boudreau
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • cancer
  • epidemiology
  • epidemic
  • prevalence
  • incidence
  • mortality
  • burden
  • screening
  • risk factors
  • prevention

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle What Is Inflammatory Breast Cancer? Revisiting the Case Definition
Cancers 2010, 2(1), 143-152; doi:10.3390/cancers2010143
Received: 14 December 2009 / Revised: 10 February 2010 / Accepted: 1 March 2010 / Published: 3 March 2010
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (122 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The case definition for inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is controversial. The American Joint Committee on Cancer defines IBC as redness, warmth and edema involving at least half the breast. The SEER program relies on a pathologic finding of dermal lymphatic invasion and recently
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The case definition for inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is controversial. The American Joint Committee on Cancer defines IBC as redness, warmth and edema involving at least half the breast. The SEER program relies on a pathologic finding of dermal lymphatic invasion and recently added those with clinical involvement of more than 3/4 of the breast. We established a registry to collect information and specimens from IBC patients to clarify the epidemiology and biology of these tumors. The goals of this report are to suggest improvements regarding case definitions and provide data on the variety of presentations relevant to early diagnosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epidemiologic Research and Cancer)
Open AccessArticle Nutrients and Risk of Colon Cancer
Cancers 2010, 2(1), 51-67; doi:10.3390/cancers2010051
Received: 2 December 2009 / Revised: 19 January 2010 / Accepted: 3 February 2010 / Published: 10 February 2010
PDF Full-text (419 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Dietary fats are thought to be important in the etiology of colon cancer. However, the evidence linking them is inconclusive. Studies on dietary protein, cholesterol and carbohydrate and the risk of colon cancer are also inconsistent. This study examined the association between dietary
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Dietary fats are thought to be important in the etiology of colon cancer. However, the evidence linking them is inconclusive. Studies on dietary protein, cholesterol and carbohydrate and the risk of colon cancer are also inconsistent. This study examined the association between dietary intake of protein, fats, cholesterol and carbohydrates, and the risk of colon cancer. Mailed questionnaires were completed by 1731 individuals with histologically confirmed cases of colon cancer and 3097 population controls between 1994 and 1997 in seven Canadian provinces. Measurements included socio-economic status, lifestyle habits and diet. A 69-item food frequency questionnaire was used to provide data on eating habits from two years before the study. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed using unconditional logistic regression. The nutrients were categorized by quartiles based on the distributions among the controls. Intake of polyunsaturated fat, trans-fat and cholesterol were significantly associated with the risk of colon cancer; the ORs for the highest quartiles were 1.36 (95% CI, 1.02–1.80), 1.37 (95% CI, 1.10–1.71) and 1.42 (95% CI, 1.10–1.84), respectively. The association was stronger with proximal colon cancer (PCC). An increased risk was also observed with increasing intake of sucrose for both proximal and distal colon cancers; the ORs for the highest quartiles were 1.67 (95% CI, 1.22–2.29) for PCC and 1.58 (95% CI, 1.18–2.10) for distal colon cancer (DCC). An elevated risk of PCC was also found with increased lactose intake. Our findings provide evidence that a diet low in fat and sucrose could reduce the risk of various colon cancers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epidemiologic Research and Cancer)

Review

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Open AccessReview The Clinical Significance of Unknown Sequence Variants in BRCA Genes
Cancers 2010, 2(3), 1644-1660; doi:10.3390/cancers2031644
Received: 29 June 2010 / Revised: 8 July 2010 / Accepted: 31 August 2010 / Published: 10 September 2010
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (405 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Germline mutations in BRCA1/2 genes are responsible for a large proportionof hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancers. Many highly penetrant predisposition alleles have been identified and include frameshift or nonsense mutations that lead to the translation of a truncated protein. Other alleles contain
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Germline mutations in BRCA1/2 genes are responsible for a large proportion of hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancers. Many highly penetrant predisposition alleles have been identified and include frameshift or nonsense mutations that lead to the translation of a truncated protein. Other alleles contain missense mutations, which result in amino acid substitution and intronic variants with splicing effect. The discovery of variants of uncertain/unclassified significance (VUS) is a result that can complicate rather than improve the risk assessment process. VUSs are mainly missense mutations, but also include a number of intronic variants and in-frame deletions and insertions. Over 2,000 unique BRCA1 and BRCA2 missense variants have been identified, located throughout the whole gene (Breast Cancer Information Core Database (BIC database)). Up to 10–20% of the BRCA tests report the identification of a variant of uncertain significance. There are many methods to discriminate deleterious/high-risk from neutral/low-risk unclassified variants (i.e., analysis of the cosegregation in families of the VUS, measure of the influence of the VUSs on the wild-type protein activity, comparison of sequence conservation across multiple species), but only an integrated analysis of these methods can contribute to a real interpretation of the functional and clinical role of the discussed variants. The aim of our manuscript is to review the studies on BRCA VUS in order to clarify their clinical relevance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epidemiologic Research and Cancer)
Figures

Open AccessReview The Changing Face of Esophageal Cancer
Cancers 2010, 2(3), 1379-1404; doi:10.3390/cancers2031379
Received: 17 June 2010 / Revised: 24 June 2010 / Accepted: 24 June 2010 / Published: 28 June 2010
Cited by 24 | PDF Full-text (304 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The two main histological esophageal cancer types, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, differ in incidence, geographic distribution, ethnic pattern and etiology. This article focuses on epidemiology with particular reference to geographic and temporal variations in incidence, along with a review of the evidence
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The two main histological esophageal cancer types, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, differ in incidence, geographic distribution, ethnic pattern and etiology. This article focuses on epidemiology with particular reference to geographic and temporal variations in incidence, along with a review of the evidence supporting environmental and genetic factors involved in esophageal carcinogenesis. Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus remains predominantly a disease of the developing world. In contrast, esophageal adenocarcinoma is mainly a disease of western developed societies, associated with obesity and gastro-esophageal reflux disease. There has been a dramatic increase in the incidence of adenocarcinoma in developed countries in parallel with migration of both esophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas towards the gastro-esophageal junction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epidemiologic Research and Cancer)

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