Special Issue "Functional Biomaterials for Regenerative Engineering"

A special issue of Bioengineering (ISSN 2306-5354).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 July 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Gulden Camci-Unal

Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: biomaterials; tissue engineering; personalized medicine; hydrogels; additive manufacturing; microfabrication; cardiovascular diseases; biomineralization; point of care diagnostics, cancer, 3D printing

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Every year millions of people suffer from the effects of disease or degeneration in tissues and organs. Due to the limited number of organ donors, there has been an increasing need for tissue-engineered constructs or strategies to induce regenerative repair after injury (e.g., heart, blood vessels, liver, lung, bone, cartilage, kidney). The ultimate goal of regenerative engineering is to repair or replace damaged tissues by converging the principles from developmental biology, stem cell biology, materials science, engineering, and medicine. In this context, biomaterial-based approaches are promising strategies. A key enabling technology for these approaches is the development of functional biomaterials containing instructive signals to modulate cell behavior.

Hydrogel-based biomaterials have been widely used in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine research, particularly to facilitate cell-cell and cell- biomaterial interactions in a controlled manner. In this Special Issue, we will include example papers for hydrogel-based biomaterials. We will also cover a wider range of biomaterial variants (e.g., porous scaffolds, nano- and micro-particles, synthetic or naturally derived polymers, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids) that highlight research results from basic science to clinical applications. This issue will also highlight the applications of these biomaterial technologies to create instructive microenvironments to control cell fate such as self-renewal, quiescence and differentiation. In addition, microfabrication techniques for regenerative engineering, such as implementation of microfluidic tools and bioprinting approaches will also be covered in this Special Issue.

Dr. Gulden Camci-Unal

Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Bioengineering is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessReview Non-Transfusional Hemocomponents: From Biology to the Clinic—A Literature Review
Bioengineering 2018, 5(2), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering5020027
Received: 11 March 2018 / Revised: 23 March 2018 / Accepted: 29 March 2018 / Published: 31 March 2018
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Abstract
Non-transfusional hemocomponents for surgical use are autogenous products prepared through the centrifugation of a blood sample from a patient. Their potential beneficial outcomes include hard and soft tissue regeneration, local hemostasis, and the acceleration of wound healing. Therefore, they are suitable for application
[...] Read more.
Non-transfusional hemocomponents for surgical use are autogenous products prepared through the centrifugation of a blood sample from a patient. Their potential beneficial outcomes include hard and soft tissue regeneration, local hemostasis, and the acceleration of wound healing. Therefore, they are suitable for application in different medical fields as therapeutic options and in surgical practices that require tissue regeneration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Biomaterials for Regenerative Engineering)
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